Benazir Bhutto’s Assassination: An International Outpouring of Shock

Posted on December 28, 2007
Filed Under >Adil Najam, Foreign Relations, People, Photo of the Day, Politics
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Adil Najam

Whatever her opponents may think of her, Benazir Bhutto was a most recognized and much-loved international figure. An icon in the best sense of the word. The shock of her death – and the manner of her death – was not confined to Pakistan. As comments on our earlier post suggests, in that moment, the entire world stopped in its tracks. It was not just the most tragic of moments, but also a most historic moment.

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These are the pictures of the front pages from just a few newspapers from across the United States and across the world. They are but a fraction of the hundreds, possibly thousands, of newspaper front pages that mourned her death. They make a fitting tribute to a woman who served twice as Pakistan’s Prime Minister, but was also a global citizen in heart and in spirit.


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Regular readers of ATP know our fascination with newspaper front pages, which we feature often as pictures in our political posts. But credit for this fine collection goes to the South Asian Journalists Association (SAJA) who have featured this collection (ATP added a few images) on SAJA Forum. My gratitude to them for this, please do visit the SAJA page where you can click on each of the front pages images for more detail in them. Additional images of international newspapers were found at another wonderful post here.

65 Comments on “Benazir Bhutto’s Assassination: An International Outpouring of Shock”

  1. Ayaz Siddiqui says:
    December 28th, 2007 7:01 pm

    The following column is written by Wajahat Masood on the death anniversary of ZAB. How true it is and the Noha written by haider Jaffrey on Benazir.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/urdu/miscellaneous/story/2006/04/060404_bhutto_wajahat_si.shtml

  2. Annabel says:
    December 28th, 2007 7:03 pm

    Excellent tribute. What a collection. This is top notch blogging guys.

  3. zakoota says:
    December 28th, 2007 7:37 pm

    She was indeed the most famous and the most well-respected Muslim woman.

    Her death is sad beyond imagination!

  4. temporal says:
    December 28th, 2007 7:43 pm

    and that hillbilly huckabee is talking about martial law and illegal immigration!

  5. Roshan says:
    December 28th, 2007 8:38 pm

    Its not only the people of Pakistan, rather every human being of this globe is condoling her tragic death. She is an immortal.

  6. Naved Haqqi says:
    December 28th, 2007 9:17 pm

    I wish I could feel as great a sense of loss as I see and read from the expressions of so many. I am definitely missing something that I hope I can find soon and relate to. Nevertheless, it is a national loss, as so many people believed in her. To me she was a great politician with a charismatic personality. What makes me a sceptic is the fact that she could not prove herself while being the premier twice and was ousted with great discountenance. A brief glance through the two periods of her premiership and her political career is enough to cast shadows on her purpose and mission. As much as she claimed to stand for democracy, she could not practice that within her own party and she used traditional political maneuvering to push aside her own mother in taking complete control of the party and proclaimed herself to be a life-time chairperson. Just because of that fact, today People’s Party is at a loss. There is simply no one that can fill her shoes and is able to carry the torch of democracy, that she claimed to have been carrying for the people. Without doubt, she was a very strong and resourceful leader. This void may not only jeopardise the party itself, but at the same time, may have catastrophic implications on the process that was inching towards democracy. I hope the leadership of other political parties realize that too.

    Yesterday’s tragic event and the pursuing carnage and bloodshed simply extrapolates the fact that both our leaders and ourselves as a nation have a long way to go before we can even start appreciating the meanings of human values, human rights, respect for other’s property and life, democracy, justice, etc. There is so much of hypocrisy and moral degeneration in every facet of our society, that it sometimes feel futile to even attempt to address them. It is also very painful to see that the People’s Party workers and their sympathizers are doing exactly what the murderers of their leader wanted. Very sad, indeed!

    But then, we are still a young country and we have to go through our trials and tribulations our own way as a nation. Some nations are lucky to get leaders that have a vision and are committed to that vision; others prefer to take longer paths and go through a painstaking process of learning through mistakes. Looks like we, the Pakistanis seem to prefer the latter and I sincerely hope that we are learning as we move forward. As far as the question, what we, the Pakistanis can do? The only one word that comes to my mind is ‘Education’. Educating ourselves and especially our young ones is the only answer. Education, that builds character, sense of value, and most important of all, an aspiration to become a good human being. Education, that teaches us to “Think”. Then can we expect, that we desire from our leadership. On the contrary, we will continue to spiral towards moral bankruptcy. No amount of such lamenting and bemoaning will suffice the need of the time.

    We have to remember one thing. Leaders of a nation rise from within the nation and are not imported. If we find fault with our leaders, it is us who are to be blamed. Such are the times when we can truly gauge our merits. If we, the elders, do our part as parents and teachers, and inculcate moral values into our younger generation, then we stand some chance of seeing our next generation as a better nation and from within that nation, better leaders. So, we really have a long way to go. God bless us all!

  7. jk says:
    December 28th, 2007 9:21 pm

    Still reeling from her death.
    Uncertainty at every step.

    First they said gun shot wound and there was a video of the gun man shooting at her.
    Then they said shrapnel
    Now they are saying she just hit her head.
    And no autopsy.
    And the police all left their posts before it happened.
    Very strange.

  8. RYAN says:
    December 28th, 2007 9:35 pm

    This is a tragedy that I’m sure Pakistan and the world will be discussing for years to come. Benazir Bhutto will be immortalized forever and is a martyr for democracy.

    Rest In Peace Benazir.

    http://www.freeryantoday.com

  9. MQ says:
    December 28th, 2007 10:04 pm

    I bet most people in Licoln, Nebraska won’t be able to locate Pakistan on the world map. And yet Liclon Journal Star has its full front page covered with Benzair. That surely says something about Benazir.

  10. faraz says:
    December 28th, 2007 10:32 pm

    Well why Benazir was that much covered? The answer is that Pakistan is nuclear country and worst nighmare of west and West saw a savior of Pakistan in Benazir with her pro western stand.

    One of the strategist of “Lexington think tank” littteraly said that we “engineered” return of Benazir.

  11. Eidee Man says:
    December 28th, 2007 11:30 pm

    I am ashamed to look at the comments by some of the so-called “educated” people in Pakistan (i.e. who can write in English and have access to the Internet).

    Benazir has always been criticized and indeed needlessly ridiculed by the drawing-room classes of Pakistan. The elite of Pakistan have always hated Benazir, and for good reason; that’s because Benazir’s core strength came from the down-trodden millions of poor Pakistanis.

    It’s good to see the outpouring of sympathy for Benazir; but the reality is that most of Pakistan, and the rest of the world, will forget about her in due time. But she, like her father, will become the stuff of SINDHI legend for generations to come.

  12. Eidee Man says:
    December 28th, 2007 11:31 pm

    I encourage everyone to read Irfan Hussain’s column in today’s Dawn:

    http://www.dawn.com/weekly/mazdak/mazdak.htm

  13. faraz says:
    December 28th, 2007 11:52 pm

    Eidee Man, I am sorry I dont have any emotional attachment to Bhutto dynasty as you have and I live in Boston.

    Talking with my americans friends here, they have impression that Pakistan is going to explode nuclearly as their only hope is gone.

    The real reason there is so much interest in Benazir is not because she was Nelson Mandella or Gandhi, but West saw her as some one who can secure Western interest in Pakistan, which they percieved as most dangerous country in world(Reality bites).

    Also she was women and she was antithesis of a typical mulsim leader. They are frustated as they tried hard to bring her back in Pakistan but not every things goes according to script.

    We now need a leader who can save interest of Pakistan. I am getting sick of ppl thinking Pakistan that unstable.

  14. MQ says:
    December 29th, 2007 12:22 am

    Many years ago when I was a student at Colorado I would glean the pages of the Rocky Mountain News to look for any news, just any, about Pakistan. But there would be none. No body knew Pakistan. Today, the paper has the front page covered with nothing but a picture of Benazir addressing a huge crowd with an eloquent caption: Hope takes a bullet.

  15. Jackie says:
    December 29th, 2007 12:59 am

    What a wonderful way to highlight the outpouring of affection for Benazir Bhutto. Plus the post looks really nice too.

  16. Saima Nasir says:
    December 29th, 2007 4:26 am

    She he was an atriculate, charismatic and a courageous woman, who spoke her mind. Whatever her weaknesses and failings, nonetheless she was popular among the masses of Pakistan, in all the four provinces. A woman of conviction, who stood her ground in the face of the fascist military regime…not once but a number of times until the fascist and the reactionary forces got rid of her forever…..May she rest in peace and Allah bless her soul.

    Her senseless assassination which caused her untimely departure left many like me shocked and speechless. Regardless of what the technical details of this murder and the direct agent or perpetrator of this criminal and cowardly act, the threads of the conspiracy definitely reach high up. The so-called Islamic fundamentalists and jihadis are only the puppets and hired assassins of reactionary forces that are entrenched in the Pakistani ruling class and the state apparatus, lavishly funded by the Pakistan Intelligence Services (ISI), drug barons with connections with the Taliban.

    This murderous onslaught on the PPP came in the middle of an election campaign where, after years of military dictatorship, the masses were striving for a change. There was a wave of support for the PPP, which probably would have won the National and provincial assembly elections that were due to be held on 8 January 2008.

    The dictator Zia murdered Benazir’s father but failed to destroy the PPP in the 1980s. The forces of state terrorism murdered Benazir’s brother, Murtazar….blaming her for it. Then they exiled Benazir and installed a new dictatorship. That also, did not prevent the PPP from experiencing a new resurrection when millions of people came onto the streets to welcome her back.

    These elements (especially military and intelligence agencies) have always destroyed the picture of popular public figures (leaders and intellectuals alike) by branding them as traitors. They have marred their images with the graffiti of corruption or treason charges which were never completely proved…. as these elements were the real deal makers and still are…..Mr. 10% is more talked about but who gets away with the 90% of the country’s wealth…..was and is never questioned.

    People, especially the (middle and upper middle class) are programmed to believe that without the military (rule)

  17. Saima Nasir says:
    December 29th, 2007 4:29 am

    oops! its ….Articulate…1st line

  18. Faizan Khan says:
    December 29th, 2007 5:06 am

    As a Pakistani I find it appalling that the media and some people of Pakistan have named Benazir bhutto the so called

  19. Indscribe says:
    December 29th, 2007 5:36 am

    Good post. Frontpages of English, Hindi and Urdu newspapers of India are missing. Some of them like Urdu dailies like Hindustan Express Delhi and Etemaad of Hyderabad gave unprecedented coverage and the frontpage was much better than Jang.

  20. December 29th, 2007 7:43 am

    Your readers may be interested in the Blog comments of David Milliband the British Foreign Secretary at

    http://blogs.fco.gov.uk/blogs/david%5Fmiliband/

    You can submit comments directly to him as well, so if there’s anything anyone wants to say about his policies this is a chance to do so.

  21. Haathi says:
    December 29th, 2007 8:05 am

    I have rarely seen this amount of solidarity in Pakistan. The blog posts (not just here) are quite cynical. But it was surprising to see how so many in Pakistan, even those who were no fans of Benaizr, felt a sense of sadness. That seems to be the explanation for why statements from political opponents have been more than perfunctory condolences–no leader seems to want to go counter to the prevailing public sentiment. Let’s hope this is a glimpse of our long dormant ‘insaniyat’.

  22. Robert says:
    December 29th, 2007 9:51 am

    Maybe you could keep adding more to this if readers send you more and turn this to an ongoing tribute to this great woman.

  23. RE says:
    December 29th, 2007 9:54 am

    173 bank torched completely
    26 bank damaged
    158 office torched and burnt completely
    23 office damaged
    24 petrol pump burnt
    2 petrol pump damaged
    370 cars completely burnt
    61 cars damaged
    72 trains bogies/coaches torched completely
    18 railway station burnt completely
    4 station damaged
    765 shops were torched completely gutted
    19 offices/shops damaged partially
    38 people killed
    53 people injured

  24. meengla says:
    December 29th, 2007 9:54 am

    Eidee Man,
    Benazir is more than a Sindhi legend. I am a Urdu speaking Pakistani from Karachi and I just spoke with my folks from Karachi. It seems obvious that there is great grief in Karachi regardless of ethnic background.
    People will keep looking for their ‘typical Muslim leader’ but, by their grief, Pakistanis have already spoken: We did have one single charismatic leader who combined grace, beauty, charisma, wit, courage, buttressed with a 30-year old track record of struggle.

    And we killed her! We killed her, a leader who may well be the main reason that many generations later the word ‘Pakistan’ may be recognized.

    Yes, it is cynical and pessimistic, but I see not much hope in Pakistan anymore unless there is a radical change in direction. And if there is no radical change in direction then we, the people of Sindh, are getting tired of seeing ‘Pindi return our leaders in coffins!

  25. legaleagle says:
    December 29th, 2007 10:09 am

    Typical! even after her death BB belongs more on the cover for foreign publications then she really does in Pakistan. Her life and work was more designed to the imagination of the west than being a capable leader to lead Pakistan. Her track record as a twice failed PM speaks louder then her imaginary perception in the wester publications indicated here. Good for Hollywood though to start looking for look-alike to perhaps come up with a movie in the next 3 years??

    BB’s death may be good for PPP if they play their cards right. PPP can emerge as a single majority party in the upcoming elections provided they pass the helm to the VP of the party Makhdoom Amin Fahim. If they do not and let Asif Ali Zardari take the lead, then PPP will be doomed forever!! From the looks of it though, it seems that PPP is heading towards self-annihilation in the next few months!

  26. December 29th, 2007 10:56 am

    Adil,

    You are spot on in the post. The reaction from opponents is probably the best yardstick as to her legacy and respect.

    Yesterday I was one of the 3,000 plus mourners who read a Ghaibana Janazah in Birmingham, England. This would shock all who know for I was an opponent yet I felt compelled to offer my condolences and show solidarity with the Bhutto family and above all Pakistan.

    These are strange times indeed.

  27. Barbara says:
    December 29th, 2007 11:53 am

    Benazir was always the symbol of Pakistan to me. I always told my friends, a country that produces a leader like that and a people who elect a woman like that (we in the US have never elected one for President, yet) cannot be bad. She made me hopeful about Pakistan. Although she is gone, I am still with the people of Pakistan because of her.

  28. Ather Mughal says:
    December 29th, 2007 11:54 am

    @Naved Haqqi

    I must say very balanced comments. I agree with this guy that the only solution of existing (and upcoming) problems is “Education of Nation”

    Thank you

  29. December 29th, 2007 12:08 pm

    I heard you mention this blog on NPR last night. It’s very informative and well constructed. I’m going to list you as a “Fuel My Blog” friend. I look forward to reading more.

  30. December 29th, 2007 1:01 pm

    death of BB has shocked every Pakistani.but the true implications and enormity of national loss are beyond comprehension at this stage.Her death is the loss of a nation which has never fully recoverd from hanging of ZAB.If there was any hope of change in the life of a common man,that hope is dead now.

  31. Atif Shahnawaz says:
    December 29th, 2007 1:18 pm

    This is a great blog.

  32. FS says:
    December 29th, 2007 1:30 pm

    I agree its a loss but i do wonder how much though? As human, i am sad that someone died like this but beyond that, i am really not sure whether was Pakistan’s loss though. I tend to agree with CNN article “Bhutto failed to modernize Pakistan – http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/12/29/pakistan.commentary/index.html” by Irshad Manji. I lived in Pakistan during her rule and Nawaz’s, and don’t remember anything either of them did that make me remember them.

  33. December 29th, 2007 1:32 pm

    MUST READ… pindiwalla

    Daughter of the West
    Tariq Ali

    Arranged marriages can be a messy business. Designed principally as a means of accumulating wealth, circumventing undesirable flirtations or transcending clandestine love affairs, they often don

  34. Saima Nasir says:
    December 29th, 2007 1:40 pm

    “she used traditional political maneuvering to push aside her own mother “- Naved Haqqi

    Nusrat Bhutto had lung cancer, but what many didn’t know was that she was also diagonosed with the Alzheimer’s disease as well, that was one of the reasons Benazir took charge of affairs.

  35. uzyus says:
    December 29th, 2007 2:24 pm

    I can’t believe that the PPP is actually believing Al-Qaeda and Baitullah Masud when they say they had no part in BB’s assassination. It is , of course, what they want us Pakistanis to believe so that Musharraf’s govt. gets further destabilized. We all should really know better than to trust them….

  36. Eidee Man says:
    December 29th, 2007 2:31 pm

    It’s extremely disturbing to mention Irshad Manji’s name with that of a great woman like Benazir in the same sentence.

  37. Tehseen says:
    December 29th, 2007 2:56 pm

    This indeed one the saddest moment in my life span so far. The event of assassination of former PM of Pakistan, itself is terrifying. However I would like to appeal the entire nation to think about the country instead of putting blames on each other. It is country which is wounded not any province or any group of people. And please try to console each other in this time of great difficulty by Praying to God and seeking his guidance.

    Whatever is happening in Pakistan, Afghanistan and in the region is due to USA a fallout of COLD WAR era which was between USA and USSR/Russia which lasted over a decade 1979-1989 and interestingly this war was not fought in the USA but the battlefield was a country called Afghanistan. The US and it’s intelligence agencies created, funded, organised and trained Muslims (unfortunately) to fight against Russians and CIA and other agencies have been owning the very same so called Talibaans for over a decade untill the completion of COLD WAR. Strange thing! a country is at war but thousands of miles away and it’s own borders are secure with almost US people having no idea what a war is like because their cities are intact and there is no devastation and effects of war. This is a subject on which you can write millions of words and can cry for millions of years but words and tears will never end because it is the killing of mankind and USA is responsible for that just for oil and maintain the supremacy over other countries/regions.

    Now, I would like to express my views to the entire world and would like to address the world leaders to leash the USA and it’s intelligence agencies which has been unleashed for decades now stop targeting countries enriched by minerals and great potential otherwise which are unfortunate MUSLIM nations. Just look around the globe and see whats happening to the places where USA has been interfering, all those countries/regions are in turmoil.

    The world has become extremely unsafe and dangerous place to live USA being the only super power, had there been another super power to balance USA out, situation would have been better.

    May GOD help us make this world safe place to live for the generations to come, irrelevant to the religion, race or ethnicity.

    In the END a simple question to everyone who reads this article: Look whats happening in IRAQ, Afghanistan, Kashmir, Palestine and WHEREVER in the world brutal killings are going on and think IF this happens in your country or in your family how would you feel.

    I think you will find the ANSWER by putting yourself in the situation and would resist the STATE TERRORISM.

  38. December 29th, 2007 3:12 pm

    I have also posted a time line of B.B on my blog

  39. Tina says:
    December 29th, 2007 3:18 pm

    This is all very interesting to me because I can’t help but think that the press is responding as if she were the present leader of |Pakistan. Can anybody tell me when the assasination of a third world opposition politician not currently in power has garned so much press attention outside his/her own country? Never. It’s worth maybe a brief mention if that. It’s not front page news for days and days.

    I think it’s less to do with Benazir Bhutto and more to do with the fact that people recognize that the stability of a very volatile area is shaken, if not lost completely.

  40. Arfeen says:
    December 29th, 2007 4:01 pm

    Does anyone know if there was a message of condolence, of grief or Fateha from the MMA, from Jamat i Islami or Fazlur Rahman?

  41. meengla says:
    December 29th, 2007 4:32 pm

    Arfeen,
    Yes, Qazi Hussain Ahmad is personally there in Larkana today to offer condolences while I have seen at least a video of Maulana Fazlul rehman offering his condolences. One promiment political person who has not even bothered to offer even a lip-service condolence is Zia ul Haq’s son Ijaz ul Haq; he may have done that though I am not aware if it?

    As someone aptly put it above: Benazir Bhutto was JFK and Princess Diana rolled into one person. But I honestly think Benazir towered above her considering BB’s struggle of 30 years and the tragedies she had to face. I would put her at par with Nelson Mendela and Myanmar’s Suu Kyi if compared with modern leaders. Though, unlike the latter two, BB was certainly ‘practical’ enough to not go through extended imprisonments. There are many other faults of BB. But if one factors in the odds against her and the peculiar socio-political milieu of Pakistan she manages to tower above her faults. The most people can accuse her to bring her down is her corruption of which only $13 million was ever bore up to ‘conviction’ and that too was taken back later. And we must not forget how the establishment of Pakistan have loathed Bhuttos and would go to any length to frame her.

  42. Linda says:
    December 29th, 2007 4:52 pm

    I like this post very much. Very powerful and beautiful way to do a post.

  43. Emma says:
    December 29th, 2007 4:55 pm

    Excellent collection. She was always a world figure and the world mourns her. May she rest in peace.

  44. Naved Haqqi says:
    December 29th, 2007 5:05 pm
  45. Kaseem Ahmad says:
    December 29th, 2007 5:17 pm

    why are mullahs NEVER the victims of suicide attacks??? anyone??

  46. Tehseen says:
    December 29th, 2007 6:38 pm

    CNN acts like a terrorist news channel.

    They dramatize a simple news to the extent that it sells like a hot cake to people who want to listen to that kind of stories.

    And mind you which attracts lot of teenagers to violence.

    CNN is spreading hatred amongst religions which is satanic and deadly.

    Look at the irony of the so called most civilised U.S. democracy and it’s presidential candidates, they are taking mileage over this saddening killing of Pakistan’s former prime minister through CNN.

    Why doesn’t CNN give the answers regarding the assassination of US President J.F Kennedy whereas they seems to know every answer in the world and every angle of politics.

    They are not perfoming the duties of journalism and a news channel rather they are performing the hidden agenda against ISLAM.

    Extremely Shameful to even talk about.

  47. readinglord says:
    December 29th, 2007 7:11 pm

    Her tragedy is too great for me to write about. It required the pen of Waris Shah or that of Shakespeare to do justice to the tragic death of Benazir like that of Heer Syaal at the hands of Paki Keidos or that of Prince Hamlet by the treacherous userper king Claudius of Denmark.

    The state of PakyStan is reeking today with treacherous ‘na-paki’.

  48. Ali says:
    December 29th, 2007 8:42 pm

    Check out Robert Fisk’s recent column in The Independent, UK.
    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/asia/article3291600.ece

    I mostly liked the part about the coverage of the local and international media. But as for who did this, many questions remain unanswered. Perhaps we do not have enough evidence as yet, probably we never will!

    This is a sad tragedy, nonetheless. My condolences to the families of all the victims in the current wave of violence and to all concerned around the world.

  49. Abdul Rafiq says:
    December 29th, 2007 11:23 pm

    I am not a PPP supporter and do not like BB, but I am very sad for her. This was very sad loss for all of us.

  50. Saima Nasir says:
    December 29th, 2007 11:48 pm

    @Naved Haqqi

    They never came out about her illness in public, especially in Pakistan where understanding of psychological and neurological disorder is very limited and socially unacceptable but just to put record straight here is an excerpt of her recent interview along with the link to it.

    Benazir Bhutto Interview
    Former Prime Minister of Pakistan

    October 27, 2000
    London, England

    “……..Was there a moment of self revelation or self-discovery when you knew what you wanted to do with your life, that you were going to be different just as your father had been different?

    Benazir Bhutto: It was not sudden. It came gradually. There were two moments, let us say, when it happened.

    One of the moments was when my father died and I had my — before he died, I had my last meeting with him, in the death cell, and he said that, “You have suffered so much.” I had been in prison myself, and he said, “You are so young. You just finished your university. You came back. You had your whole life and look at the terror under which we have lived.” So he said, “I set you free. Why don’t you go and live in London or Paris or Switzerland or Washington, and you are well taken care of, and have some happiness because you have seen too much suffering.” I reached out through the prison bars, and I remember grasping his hands and saying, “No, papa, I will continue the struggle that you began for democracy.”

    So that was one of the points where I decided that I didn’t want out. I’d stay, but I still didn’t think I’d ever be prime minister.

    I thought my mother would be the prime minister, and that I’d work for her to be the prime minister, and that’s what I did. But my mother got sick and actually she had lung cancer, but we didn’t know she was getting Alzheimer’s. So she started behaving differently and we thought it’s because she’s had this serious illness, and she’s reflecting on how to lead her life. And suddenly I found that since mommy was away and the whole party was about to collapse unless I was there, so I started looking after the party at that stage. When I went back, I remember people were shouting, “Prime Minister Benazir!” And suddenly it struck me that “looking after” means — with mommy ill — “looking after” means that I will be the prime minister. So it was in that sort of moment when I realized the responsibility that I had taken over could lead me all the way to an office that could govern the destiny of more than 100 million Muslims in Pakistan. …………”

    This interview can be accessed at:

    http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/bhu0int-2

  51. Meredith says:
    December 30th, 2007 2:27 am

    The news that benazir was murdered has shocked and saddened me
    the world has become a darker place with this act.

  52. Steve in NYC says:
    December 30th, 2007 8:00 am

    Many comments reflect this sentiment… “Her life and work was more designed to the imagination of the west than being a capable leader to lead Pakistan.”.

    As an outsider, I must ask, did the West orchestrate the outpouring of support for BB? Was the grass-roots response to her return have something to do with the CIA of M15? Curious.

    The 46 front-pages shown in this post reflect a GLOBAL response to her assignation, not just a Western response. The sentiments of free thinkers and free press’, maybe not knowing the true underpinnings of your country’s struggles, but still recognizing BB as a glimmer (if not a beacon) of hope. I would suggest this hope is not only for a safer planet, but hope for the downtrodden and neglected peoples of Pakistan. As a note, I notice Adil is operating this website with a “.com” domain, not a .pk”. Perhaps the free-thinking world would like to see a time where a similar blog can be operated from within Pakistan without the fear of ending up where BB has.

    If anyone seriously thinks the West could orchestrate anything of this magnitude in order to objectify their desires, I have a bridge I’d like to sell you.

    My sincere condolences to those of you who mourn the loss, and I express my gratitude to ATP for having such a great forum for the free exchange of ideas. Thanks you Adin.

  53. Rafay Kashmiri says:
    December 30th, 2007 6:52 pm

    @Kaseem Ahmed

    Mullah are not victims of blast because
    a. they don’t belong to colonial class
    b. they are not as corrupt as BB
    c. they are respected not worshipped.
    d. they are faithfull Pakistanis
    e. they speak national languages very good.
    f. they are not corruptible “Roshan Khayal ”
    made in USA or UK.
    g. they are serious simple practicing muslims
    (some of them might be special)
    h. they have the courage get bullets on their chests
    I. they are only afraid of God not Musharraf.
    Lal Masjid case where they were slain in thousands.
    J. they respect religion, moral, family, and others.
    K. THEY ARE BELIEVERS IN ALLAH & RASOOL
    AND HIS RELIGION.

    l. AND THEY BELIEVE IN DEMOCRACY

  54. Musalmaan says:
    December 30th, 2007 7:50 pm

    So, My derest Maulvi Rafay Kashmiri, if you are right then you are saying that the Mullahs are not targeted because they have all these qualities, which means you are saying that the people who are committing these murders (of Benazir plus other murders in bombings) are actually people who also respect these values… i.e., that these bombings and murders ARE DONE BY MULLAHS THEMSELVES.

    THANK YOU RAFAY KASHMIRI FOR ACCEPTING AND CONFESSING THAT YOUR MULLAHS ARE BEHIND ALL THESE BOMBINGS AND MURDERS. I have never before heard a Mullah confess to his crimes so I am impressed by your honesty. At least there is one honest Mullah. Unfortaunately, only one!

  55. Semal says:
    December 30th, 2007 10:09 pm

    This is a type of shock I could hardly believe of….I was just shaken and to add more, the people put so much harm to the country in the name of grief..To read abt the adiminstrative failures after Benazir’s death, plz have a look at:

    http://www.chowrangi.com/administrative-failure-after-benazir-bhuttos-assassination.html

  56. Hunaina says:
    December 31st, 2007 12:17 am

    I am just deeply saddened by the tragic death of Benazir. I was and still am not involved or aware of politics in Pakistan though I am a Pakistani, I just always wanted peace and prosperity for my country.But for sure, I alwys admired Benazir Bhutto, as the first woman prime minister in the Muslim world, a role model for so many of us. She was very articulate, educated and I admired her for that. She was a bold lady. I feel sorry for her children. they have lost their mother at a very young age in such a tragic manner. My heart goes out to them.And Pakistyan has lost yet another asset.No one can replace her. She was the symbol of modern and progressive Pakistan .How can any human take the life of another person ? She was our hope.. hope for a million people. As for the corruption charges, to be honest, name one politician in the sub continent who has not made money. This is not to say that she did. Allah knows better.I dont know. But all said and done, after all she was amother to 3 children, she was a human being, a lady, a leader of millions, a progressive bold lady. No body deserves to die like this. The Bhutto family has sacrificed way too much. Only those without a heart will not feel sorry at this point for her. I cry for her.. but all the tears in this world will not bring her back to life. We have lost her. Some one has snatched her away from us and deprived us of a leader. May Allah punish all those involved in this heinous crime in this world and the hereafter and grant Benazir a place in heaven.Aameen.

  57. Kaseem Ahmad says:
    December 31st, 2007 1:41 pm

    indeed an honest mullah if ever there was, thankfully mulahs are now exposing themselves or they would have the stupid pakistani population worship and pray to them if they could.

    i would love to see the mullahs suicide themselves out of pakistan.

  58. Deborah says:
    December 31st, 2007 8:10 pm

    Very nice tribute to a great lady.

  59. December 31st, 2007 9:52 pm

    Images of some 30 new newspaper front pages for that date have been added to the post. Most of these are newspaper front pages from Europe and Latin America.

  60. Daktar says:
    January 1st, 2008 12:52 am

    Interesting how in the Daily Times front page the picture of ZAB is bigger than that of BB on the day BB died.

  61. Junaid says:
    January 1st, 2008 6:33 pm

    There is no doubt in my mind that she was murdered by Musharraf. However he may not have anticipated that the reaction to her killing would be this strong and will almost unite the people of Pakistan.

    Its quite ironic that he is forced to call it a national tragedy and call her a national leader when 6 months ago she wasn’t seen as fit to be part of Pakistani politics.

  62. Maqbool Zaman says:
    January 2nd, 2008 1:47 am

    Regardless of our political views & difference of opinions, as a Muslim & Pakistani I extend my condolences on the death of BB and feel sure that any sensible individual would feel sad on such a senseless killing of anyone while BB has gained a level of popularity among those who appreciated the sentimental spirit that were instilled in the majority of Pakistani people’s minds as she is the savior which now extends to a belief by many that no one else can steer Pakistan unless it is BB.
    She is now with her creator in the court of most supreme Allah the Almighty therefore I cease to comment any further on how I saw her in the political arena of Pakistan.
    Like said in other comments Pakistanis need to embrace education and not merely to adopt a profession but to opt for civility since, rights & privileges are the share of those who practice civic mannerism & discipline. It is a matter of close observation that the methods used in Pakistan specially in politics are based on the “might is right” attitudes & practices. Even in the instances of traffic accidents the one who gets out of their vehicle and slaps & curses the other driver comes out a winner, let me hear if it is not so?
    The current generation of Pakistan needs to seriously & sincerely think and act NOW that they need to bring up leadership from amongst themselves and not become habitually dependent on ancestral dynasty systems of leadership.
    Its high time that we introduce new blood in the system of govt. & discourage the old methods which were based on “not what you know, but, whom do you know.”
    When a nation is appropriately educated and practices civics and are able to agree to disagreements of others, as opposed to the prevailing practice to eliminate those who do not agree with our point of view.
    As a nation of Muslims we should have greater regard for other’s property & life and should refrain from the type of destruction that is experienced after the demise of BB.
    The killing of one human is like the killing of entire humanity.
    May Allah SWT protect our homeland and fellow citizens, ameen.

  63. Kruman says:
    January 2nd, 2008 5:13 am

    Benazir was a source of strength for the federation. She was a courageous and a brave lady who was not afraid to stand up to tyrants. I have never been a PPP supporter, but today I stand by her party in grieving her loss.

    Charo’n soobo’n ki zanjeer
    Benazir Benazir

    Ya Allah, Ya Rasool (SW)
    Benzir bay qasoor

  64. Hermoon Gill says:
    December 27th, 2010 5:43 pm

    The only difference I can think of,if she were alive today is,she would have strengthened the federation and maybe Pakistan’s image abroad may have been better than it is today.
    Other than that she hardly made a difference to an ordinary Pakistani’s life.

  65. December 27th, 2011 3:37 am

    Awesome post, definitely bookmarking this cool blog post. Thanx for using your knowledge to write and share content like this article. Cya

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