Posted on March 11, 2011
Filed Under >Pervaiz Munir Alvi, Architecture, Economy & Development, Science and Technology
25 Comments
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25 responses to “The Bridges of Pakistan”

  1. Sara says:

    Very informative. Thank you for the post.

  2. Arif says:

    nice post. I learnt lot from this.

  3. SM says:

    @Osama Yawar
    There is no doubt that graduating engineers are always full of energy and with new bright ideas. They have been taught well in the universities, but I always feel that there is one subject that none of pakistani universities offers. And that is “engineering ethics”.
    Actually not only engineering field, unfortunately this thing lacks in almost all walks of life in Pakistan.
    If we have qualified ethical engineers at both ends i.e. delivering and recieving, no corruption can prevail and as a result, we can start having encouragement to creativity.

  4. Osama Yawar says:

    You are so right SM but whats the solution for that? Check and balance? Who will do that? There are many questions that comes in mind . The problem is not only the government but the system as well. I know many newly qualified civil Engineers who took big tenders in Mardan And Charsadda by paying big amounts.

    So when you say “the pakistani engineers have a “kaam chalao” policy, and they go for only the cheapest solution setting back the aesthetics of their design.” , Its just because they have to pay to get tenders. So we need to change the system , none other is the solution.

  5. SM says:

    For all ENGINEERS and those who ask that why we do not build such engineered bridges anymore.

    I remember in 2007 there was a proposal by a Chinease consultants of errecting a single span wires hanging bridge to be placed on Jehlum river near muzaffarabad. The proposed shape looked close to famous golden gate bridge in SFO. That proposal was presented in front of our planning comission. The commision asked to investigate what it would cost if we build a bridge on our own. The pakistani consultants presented a “typical” concrete bridge design (copied from some earlier bridge) amounting about half of what earlier proposal costs.

    The point I want to say is, the pakistani engineers have a “kaam chalao” policy, and they go for only the cheapest solution setting back the aesthetics of their design.

    The best example is a simple “home” design, which architects copy from western magazines and then use concrete and brick to just cover it up, ruling out our traditional mughal architecture / workability.

    So there is a need for senior engineers to encourage new engineers / architects to come up with their new ideas, thoughts and then backing their thoughts to finally formalizing the projects.