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The Treasures of Takht-i-Bahi

Posted on April 25, 2007
Filed Under >Darwaish, Culture & Heritage, History, Travel
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By Darwaish

As many readers rightly guessed, the picture in the last ATP Quiz was of Takht-i-Bahi, a Buddhist monastery dating back to 1st to 7th century AD.

Takht means “throne” and bahi, “water” or “spring” in Persian/Urdu. The monastic complex was called Takht-i-Bahi because it was built atop a hill and also adjacent to a stream. Located 80 kilometers from Peshawar and 16 kilometers northwest of the city of Mardan, Takht-I-Bahi was unearthed in early 20th century and in 1980 it was included in the UNESCO World Heritage list as the largest Buddhist remains in Gandhara, along with the Sahr-i-Bahlol urban remains that date back to the same period, located about a kilometer south.

I have been there in 2003 and it is surprisingly well maintained and thankfully safe despite what the Taliban did across the border. Researchers believe that the monastery of Takht-i-Bahi was first mentioned by General Court, the French officer of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1836 and it is the most impressive and complete Buddhist monastery in Pakistan. Takht-i-Bahi consists of numerous chapels and stupas sticking to the high, rocky spurs. Just for reader’s information, a stupa is a Buddhist mound like structure and usually has a square base, a hemispherical dome, a conical spire, a crescent moon and a circular disc. Stupas were erected over the remains of Buddha, his disciples and other saints. They also hold objects traditionally associated with Buddha.


The complex of Takht-i-Bhai is impressively situated on a rocky spur (hill) some 300-500 feet above the Peshawar plain. From the top of the hill behind monastery, one can look down across the plains as far as Peshawar on one side and up to the Malakand Pass and the hills of Swat on the other and towards north is the Hindu Kush. This site has produced fragmentary sculptures in stone and stucco (a material made of an aggregate, a binder, and water which is applied wet, and hardens when it dries) that indicate the highly developed sculptural sense of their creators.

But the most remarkable feature is the design and arrangement of the range of small shrines, which surrounds the main stupa-court. The main stupa court at Takht-i-Bhai contained subsidiary stupas but was lined on three sides with larger and smaller image chapels with significant parts of their superstructure still intact. Much of the friezes and statuary was removed between 1907 and 1913, some of which can be seen on site and in museums in Pakistan.

The Vinaya text (a word in PÄÂ?li as well as in Sanskrit, with literal meaning ‘humility’) which is the textual framework for the Buddhist monastic community, or sangha, throws light on the architecture of the monastery. The village is built on the ruins of the ancient town, the foundation walls of which are still in a tolerably good formation. As a proof, that it was in the past occupied by the Buddhists and Hindu races, coins of those periods are still found at the site, the monks constructed it for their convenience. Spring water was supplied to them on hilltops; living quarters for ventilators for light and alcoves for oil lamps were made in the walls. From the description of Song Yun, a Chinese pilgrim, it appears that it was on one of the four great cities lying along the important commercial route to India. It was a well-fortified town with four gates outside the northern one, on the mound known as Chajaka Dehri which was a magnificent temple containing beautiful stone images covered in gold leaves. Not far from the rocky defile of Khaperdra did Ashoka build the eastern gate of the town outside of which existed a stupa and a sangharama.

The group of buildings unearthed after archeological excavations at Takht-i-Bahi may include; the court of many Stupas, the monastery, the main stupa, the assembly hall, the low-level chambers, the courtyard, the court of three stupas, the wall of colossi and the secular building. In 1871, Sergeant Wilcher found innumerable sculptures at Takht-i-Bahi. Some depicted stories from the life of Buddha, while others more devotional in nature included the Buddha and Bodhisattava.

The Court of Stupas is surrounded on three sides by open alcoves or chapels. The excavators were of the view that originally they contained single plaster statues of Buddha either sitting or standing, dedicated in memory of holy men or donated by rich pilgrims. The monastery on the north was probably a double storied structure consisting of an open court, ringed with cells, kitchens and a refectory. Walking further, you will come across the monastery court which was a residential area and as such a small number of sculptures were recovered. However, a beautiful emaciated Siddhartha in three parts was discovered. Likewise the other courts with Buddha’s images in stucco are equally interesting and they were used either for meditation, meetings or storage.

Regarding the current condition of this majestic site, although it is in good shape today, archeologists are warning that the site is in danger of collapse if an earthquake hits the region. The structure has been damaged by the quarrying operations, blasting activities and shock waves in the 90’s. Some walls at the ruins have been affected by rainwater, which began accumulating after passages in the ruins were paved as part of a maintenance project. The provincial archeology department has only five engineers to look after 74 ruins in the province, which is not enough to keep them all in proper repair. Although the Government of Pakistan has taken a number of steps to protect the ruins (including buying the quarrying company in 2002 to stop blasting and shock waves nearby) but much more needs to be done otherwise we will only find Takht-I-Bahi in history and archeology books.

Sources: Checkout this wonderful Heritage Tour link (you need to have QuickTime installed) that gives a 360-degree view of the Buddhist monastery. Google Earth also presents an interesting view of this truly majestic site. More information available here, here and here.

45 Comments on “The Treasures of Takht-i-Bahi”

  1. Ali Aslam says:
    April 25th, 2007 1:43 am

    Yeah, I think I’ve been there. Is “Julian” or something like that the same place? I met the “chokidar” of the place, he seemed quite depressed, because he was the only caretaker of the area. It seemed well-maintained but I saw that in some of the stupas the heads of the “bhudda’s” were cut off, the chokidar said some illiterate people did that, the rest as I remember was given to the Taxila museum. The chokidar also told me that many Japenese, Chineses, bhuddists in general go to a certain place in the complex where they poke their finger in a hole? Something holy? Well, anyway it was a great experience.

  2. N. Rehman says:
    April 25th, 2007 8:58 am

    I visited takht-i-bahi 5 years ago and it is an amazing place. Dont forget to visit nearby charsadha city which was once capital of ghandhara and has many wonderful sites to see. I dont think it is well maintained though, there is no guide for foreign tourists, a lot of places desperately need repair but not much is being done. The only reason which has kept it safe is probably its \’inaccessibility\’. If only govt pays proper attention to repair work and encourage foreign tourists, it can generate billions of rupees. Unfortunately our ruler class is just so inefficient and incompetent.

    Very informative and interesting read. thank you.

  3. Anwar says:
    April 25th, 2007 9:16 am

    Thanks Darwaish. It was a very informative post. I have been there too. Like Texila antique trade, a person approached me and from layers of folded cloth produced statue of Buddha. He claimed it was original and also promised to take me to the “cave” where he excavated his prized possession. I paid 30 Rupees (1972 money). Upon my return home as I tried to wash the dirt off, statue started to melt in the sink… Your post brought these memories back.
    Eighteen years later, I had a similar experience with god-figure I purchased in Xalapa, Mexico…
    No complaints – sometimes it is fun being fooled!
    Thanks.

  4. YLH says:
    April 25th, 2007 9:41 am

    Not only is this our cultural heritage as Pakistanis… but there is a poignant lesson to be learnt from this remarkable ruins … Individual life as well as that of the collective is mortal… it is not about how long we are here… as individuals and Pakistanis… but what we leave behind in this world that counts…

    The future will no doubt study the “Pakistani Era” many millenia from now… lets give them something they can truly be in awe of.

  5. Afaq Jamali says:
    April 26th, 2007 11:22 am

    I agree that this site is doing a great job. In some ways it is the political and religious issues that always get the angry types worked up and drown out so many other important issues. Politics and religion are important but since only a few people take over those disucsssions and turn them into battameez shouting matches, those discussions here are the least intersting.

    It is things like this that I most wait for.

    I do not know if non-Pakistanis are learning about Pakistan from this website or not, but I know that many Pakistanis like myself are.

    Thank you.

  6. Owais Mughal says:
    April 25th, 2007 10:25 am

    Darwaish
    Very informative and I also like the collection of photos you chose for this post.

  7. Pervaiz Munir Alvi says:
    April 25th, 2007 11:04 am

    A truly wonderful post. Definitely on the list of places to visit in Pakistan.

    Out of curiosity, how close the new Islamabad-Peshawar Motorway will get to this site. Since the site is on the UNESCO World Heritage list, there must be some funds coming from the UN for the preservation and maintenance of this site. One may hope that after the ‘commission’ is taken some of the funds will actually be spent for their intended purposes. What are the chances of Pakistani Citizens getting involved in this preservation process, or, we are waiting for the Government to do this job, like we always do. As our friend Hamadani says, lets leave some thing behind for the coming generations to talk about and be proud of us.

  8. Eidee Man says:
    April 25th, 2007 3:11 pm

    Great article. I’d like to congratulate the Pakistaniat team for continuing to feature great posts on topics that are relevant to us as Pakistanis.

    I was just reading Masud Alam’s (BBC) latest (irrelevant, absurd, and overall, poor as usual) column and was once again reminded how much of a gaping hole this site is covering.

  9. Asim says:
    April 25th, 2007 7:32 pm

    I really enjoyed reading this article and this blog is just amazing overall.

    @Pervaiz Munir Alvi: What can we possibly do? You have not suggested anything.

    One thing, in my view we can do is make our Buddhist friends abroad aware of this gift that we have in Pakistan and seek their help in its repair and restoration work. I don\’t think there is any Buddhist community in Pakistan? I am sure there are a lot of organizations/NGOs in countries like Japan, US etc with big pockets who might be willing to help. More research work and publications on larger scale should be encouraged, tourists should be encouraged to visit. Like someone said above, with a little bit of effort we can generate some really good money out of it too. Excellent articles like this one can be used as a tool to project a different image of Pakistan and show the world the diverse heritage we have.

    Its not just our responsibility but its a shared one and everyone should contribute to protect it.

  10. Pervaiz Munir Alvi says:
    April 26th, 2007 9:37 am

    Well Asim there are many rich publicity seeking Hollywood types who have joined the Buddhist bandwagon lately. Our tourism industry could always invite them as a starter. I mean it will not be right for us 150 million strong Muslim Pakistanis to donate our time and money for the restoration of a non-Islamic site. Would it be? (In case some one has missed it, I am being a bit sarcastic here).

  11. Agitator says:
    April 27th, 2007 4:42 am

    Well expect little from people who generally love to poke their noses in all kinds of political discussions but hardly bother about \’ilmi\’ material. How many people read serious articles like this one or what Shirazi or MQ write on this blog compared to those waste of time political discussion (the only purpose of which is to prove I am right and you are wrong)? However, I think writing similar kind of articles is one way of contributing and a very good one. Who knows someone powerful (hukmuraan) also reads this and decides to do something. I heard Mushy mentioned reading this blog, is that true?

    On a side note, takht-i-bahi is relative lucky to have been included in UNESCO\’s heritage sites but there are hundreds of others which slowly being destroyed because of lack of proper care. I wonder if this forum can also highlight all such sites in Pakistan, one by one?

  12. Aftab Zia says:
    May 3rd, 2007 6:09 pm

    Wonderful article. If you get a chance, please also write about the historical places in nearby Charsadha.

  13. rob says:
    July 25th, 2007 5:46 pm

    In the absence of a compassion for non-muslim cultural heritage preservation, Pakistan will continue to face grave problems. If Pakistan wants to bolster tourism industry it has to instill some democratic thought process among its subjects and be not afraid of being wiped out by the non-muslim community. After all most people are God-fearing animals. The forces of nature are far greater than any human beings can ever imagine. So we have to respect God more than we fear human beings. Live and let live.Distribute your goodwill to humanity and not just to muslims – and wait for their wonderous fruition. Learn from nature – A rose does not distribute its fargrance selectively – why should you – we are both creation of the same God.

  14. Anwar Raza or Tuan Cai says:
    August 21st, 2007 11:48 pm

    This is amazing. I know a few friends from Mardan and they never told me about this place. I have never been there and would like to visit Takht-i-Bahi in 2008.

    I am Buddhist and would like to adopt this place and re-establish as monastry. ( Yes , I have resources)

    Please share, if this “dream”can become a reality in present situation where wars are going on?

    Call me if you like at US 832-633-5176

  15. basit says:
    August 27th, 2007 9:35 am

    I visited takht-i-bahi 2 years ago and it is an historical place. The only reason which has kept it safe is probably its \

  16. February 6th, 2008 4:45 pm

    Brilliant. I had not heard of it….please archive this properly…shhhhhhhhh! don’t let them find out about it……smile!!!.

    Good Job

    Moin

    http://www.rupeenews.com

  17. June 5th, 2008 2:10 am

    I am convinced that Gotama Buddha had nothing to do with modern Nepal but was from Kuh-e Khwaja in Seistan. The location of lumbini in Nepal was a British forgery.(See http://www.lumkap.org.uk). Now if he was from the Seistan-Gandhara area there must have been a monastery named Nalanda in this area which he is said to have visited. Nalanda in modern Bihar was a great centre of learning but it came later. I would split the name as Nahr + Anda which connects it with a river. Which was this older Nalanda? Is the present dating of Takht-i-bahi firm?
    Regards,
    Dr. Ranajit Pal

  18. June 5th, 2008 2:38 am

    I have read about Buddhist finds near Gwadur which is near Seistan but the reports were scratchy. Are there any pictures available?
    My website address is http://www.ranajitpal.com

    Regards,

    Dr, Ranajit Pal

  19. Sajid Gardezi says:
    August 4th, 2008 3:51 pm

    Very nicely written Mr. Darwaish.

    Definitely on my list of must-visit places next year. I hope that law and order situation will be better then. But then I wonder, looking at increasing Taliban activities in the area, will there be anything left in 2-3 years time?

  20. October 6th, 2008 5:44 am

    I am pretty sure that this is GIKI. Swabi and Mardan are sister districts and the distance between two is hardly 40-45 KM (btw Takht-i-Bahi is also 17 KM outside Mardan in a small town Shahbaz Garhi). It takes hardly 50-60 minutes to reach Takht-i-Bahi from GIKI campus. Several references are available to support this including GIKI website.

    Also note that the picture the is taken from the top of a hill behind the buddhist monastery and from there one can look down across the plains as far as Peshawar on one side and up to the Malakand Pass and the hills of Swat on the other and towards north is the Hindu Kush.

    It is very interesting indeed and it would be great if anyone can provide further information on that. Any GIKI student/faculty reading this?

    PS: while looking for information on the subject I also came to know that there is a town called Zaidane in NWFP :)

  21. saleem says:
    October 6th, 2008 5:49 am

    AOA
    Takht Bhai is a historical place for visitors and tourists.there are alot of places to see in pakistan but it is famous for cultural and Heritage of ancient cultures.This site will bring alot of money ,profit to pakistan.

  22. October 6th, 2008 5:49 am

    I am convinced that Gotama Buddha had nothing to do with modern Nepal but was from Kuh-e Khwaja in Seistan. The location of lumbini in Nepal was a British forgery. Now if he was from the Seistan-Gandhara area there must have been a monastery named Nalanda in this area which he is said to have visited. Nalanda in modern Bihar was a great centre of learning but it came later. I would split the name as Nahr + Anda which connects it with a river. Which was this older Nalanda? Is the present dating of Takht-i-bahi firm?
    Regards,
    Sabar Khan

  23. October 12th, 2008 11:30 pm

    Takht Bhai is a historical place located in pakistan.people visit this place because it is known for ancient historical Heritage of Buddas.It is almost 20 kilometers away from peshawar.The historical heritage is going to be loss because government can,t support it.If properly managed so alot of vistors and tourists can come to see it and pakistan will earn alot of money from it.The UN listed it in old historical Heritage site but they also can,t support it.only korean and japnease government promised for support of Takht Bhai Historical Heritage of Pakistan.
    I suggest buddas religion people to come,see,and preserve it.
    Thanks.

  24. aftab alam says:
    October 13th, 2008 1:43 am

    Takht Bhai is a historical place in Pakistan.it is famous for old budda Historical Heritage. Unfortunately Government do,nt pay attention to it. It needs to preserve because this historical heritage is quite important for budda religion and also this site will attract a lot of visitors and tourists to watch it. This article along with Blogs will great for this Heritage site. This will help people to know about this Historical Heritage in Pakistan.
    Thank you.
    Regards
    AFTAB ALAM, NWFP

  25. fayyaz Ahmad says:
    October 14th, 2008 7:38 am

    Takht bhai is located near Mardan and this place is known for the old historical Budda centre which is discovered many year ago. This place is very famous in pakistan and internationally as well for this historical heritage.Alot of visiters come every day to see the ancient heritage.This place is also very attractive to tourists as well.This Heritage is going to be lost because it is in very very old condition therefore proper attention and maintance is needed.If it is preserved alot of money will be earned from this place directly and indirectly. More than that this article is great and Amazing and this is a good way so that people came to know about this historical place.
    Thank you

  26. Numan says:
    November 9th, 2008 9:57 am

    I have been there since last 2 years.Its very attractive place for Buddha religion people and very important tourist attraction.It takes two hours from peshawar NWFP.The TakhtBhai The village is built on the ruins of the ancient town.The Japanese and korean Government showed their intrest to save it with latest technology tools.Its also listed under UN heritage programs.But still it needs very quick and sudden protection because its walls are very very old.one can see its pictures on google.Archeologists are warning that the site is in danger of collapse if an earthquake hits the region. For pakistan its restoration will be very ecomical for the government.Pakistan can earn alot of money in the form of inviting tourists and Buddha religion people.

    Numan

  27. imran khan afridi says:
    November 13th, 2008 5:11 pm

    takht bhai is the one of the most ancient cities of pakistan, but it is deprived from basic needs. a city which hold some ancient history which date back to 1000 bc. takht bahi is my home town and i proud to be its citizen

  28. Shahid Iqbal says:
    November 30th, 2008 8:07 am

    Assalam o Alaikum !

    All of my freinds and countrymen, those who are giving comments about the ancient place Takht Bhai has good experience there. So i am also the one who has seen this place alot. And invited his freinds from here and there to see this historical place. I grown up in this city my education and my games are related but the sad things we left this city because my relatives were not good to us and cut off all the relationships with us and now are in another city I miss the City alot.
    Respects
    to All.

  29. Hameed ul.Haq says:
    December 7th, 2008 1:50 am

    I visited TakhtBhai last year and I saw this historical place. I wondered how old people live and how they worship. It

  30. Hameed ul.Haq says:
    December 7th, 2008 1:59 am

    Takht-Bahi situated about 80 kilometers from Peshawar has ruins of an ancient Buddhist monastery atop a hill. Takht-I-Bahi is an impressive Buddhist Monastery in Pakistan. The site has rectangular court and the small shrines that surround the stupa-court. The shrines are classical example of fine design and architecture. The hill offers magnificent views of the surrounding area. It is a wonderful experience to tour Takht-I-Bahi. A tour to Takht-I-Bahi is not only about history but also offers a wonderful opportunity to know and understand the culture of the region. This place needs proper attention and preservation from government and other organizations like UN etc.

  31. December 29th, 2008 2:17 am

    TakhtBhai is a small village type place near Peshawar .i saw this place and I was much insipired by the old people living style and standards. The site is a great source of information on Buddhism and the way of life people here used to follow. The village is built on the ruins of the ancient town, the foundation walls of which are still in a tolerably good formation. The monks constructed it for their convenience. Spring water was supplied to them on hill tops; living quarters for ventilators for light and alcoves for oil lamps were made in the walls. From the description of Song Yun, a Chinese pilgrim, it appears that it was on one of the four great cities lying along the important commercial route to India. Takht Bhai is well connected by road with the rest of the country.it will be a graet place for visitors and tourist type people.If it preserved properly and government pay good attention I think its a great asset for pakistan.

  32. SAYED BAKHT NAMDAR says:
    January 10th, 2009 1:32 am

    Takht-I-Bahi is an impressive Buddhist Monastery in Pakistan. It is important to preserve it properly and also needs local people attention as well.it is registered under UN list and it needs to develop a Management plan to manage these places properly. It helps college students worldwide by providing the most extensive, lowest-priced service for Cultural Heritage research papers and thesis writing.i know TakhtBhai very well because I got married with a girl from this place. It is a wonderful place and whenever I visit takhtbhai I often see this old historical site of Buddhas because its near to us.

  33. February 12th, 2009 1:57 am

    TakhtBhai are the village near Peshawar. It is famous due to the old historical heritage exits here. The site of that heritage contains old heritage items like old tools, utensils, stuppas and Buddhas.This site needs attention to preserve further it from more damage. This is also good site to visit because of its good location including river, mountains and its good weather. Pakistani government gives focus to it and also this site is now under the supervision on Ministry of culture Islamabad. I been there more times its really a good experience to visit to know about old people living standards. How they passed their time. A lot of local people get employment from this site and it brings good money and revenue to local people. Due to its importance this Historical Place is also listed in UN world Heritage.

  34. Irfan says:
    February 13th, 2009 2:27 am

    TakhtBhai is located near Peshawar and Mardan city. The monastic complex was called Takht-i-Bahi because it was built atop a hill and also adjacent to a stream. TakhtBhai is the most fertile Tehsil in the Mardan Division. This is old historical Buddha Place and it needs to preserve for the coming generations. In Pakistan research needed for such type of heritage sites which brings a lot of money and visitors to Pakistan. There are many crops grown in the Takht Bhai Tehsil, some of which are tobacco, wheat and sugar cane. Asia’s first sugar mill was built here by the British Government near the Buddhist monastery.

  35. February 13th, 2009 8:24 am

    The villages of Lund Khwar, Sher Garh Charsadda Sehri-Bahlol Takkar and Mazdoor Abad is another historical place in the vicinity of Takht-Bhai. Takkar is a historical village. The legend Sardar Ali Takkar belongs to this village, he is a well renowned singer of pashtu language. Takhtbai contains the remains of Buddha which has not been properly preserved.Alot of visitors national and international comes to this heritage site to see it.By developing such places more pakistan will take their advantage in terms of profit and tourism.

  36. sana ullah says:
    February 14th, 2009 5:04 am

    The village is located on hill surrounded by lush green field where the local people practice agriculture. Economically people are poor with low literacy ratio. The local people continue illegal excavation in their homes and land demaging the historical monoments. Some of the local dealors of antiques misguide the local population and instigate them to involve them in illegal excavation. It requires national and international attention specially pakistani government and UN ,so that to preserve the raimnants at this heritage place

  37. pervez khan says:
    February 14th, 2009 5:39 am

    I have been there in 30th August and it is surprisingly well maintained and thankfully safe. Researchers believe that the monastery of Takht-i-Bahi was first mentioned by General Court, the French officer of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1836 and it is the most impressive and complete Buddist monastery in Pakistan. Takht-i-Bahi consists of numerous chapels and stupas sticking to the high, rocky spurs. Just for reader information, a stupa is a Buddhist mound like structure and usually has a square base, a hemispherical dome, a conical spire, a crescent moon and a circular disc. Stupas were erected over the remains of Buddha, his disciples and other saints. They also hold objects traditionally associated with Buddha. Many visitors and tourists come to this historical heritage place daily.

  38. February 18th, 2009 2:15 am

    Regarding the current condition of this majestic site, although it is in good shape today, archeologists are warning that the site is in danger of collapse if an earthquake hits the region. The structure has been damaged by the quarrying operations, blasting activities and shock waves in the 90s. Some walls at the ruins have been affected by rainwater, which began accumulating after passages in the ruins were paved as part of a maintenance project. The provincial archeology department has only five engineers to look after 74 ruins in the province, which is not enough to keep them all in proper repair. Although the Government of Pakistan has taken a number of steps to protect the ruins (including buying the quarrying company in 2002 to stop blasting and shock waves nearby) but much more needs to be done otherwise we will only find Takht-I-Bahi in history and archeology books.

  39. tufailgul says:
    February 18th, 2009 4:37 am

    Pakistan have most historical places , one of them is Takh Bhai Heritage. One can find ” Buddha” , which have historical preservation for Buddhists.
    In contrast Takht Bhai heritage have great history, so it is better for Tourists ,if toursits and other intrested peoples are visisted here from other contries , they will find historical things and places , and it will be great for paksitan .
    Blog on such things like Takht Bhai Heritage is a great deal for earning money.

  40. khanji says:
    February 18th, 2009 7:14 am

    Takht Bhai conatins the old Buddha historical heritage sites and it is well connected by road with the rest of the country.for visitors and tourists the tour to Takht-I-Bahi is not only about history but also offers a wonderful opportunity to know and understand the culture of the region. Sergeant Wilcher found innumerable sculptures at Takht-i-Bahi. Some depicted stories from the life of Buddha, while others more devotional in nature included the Buddha and Bodhisattva. The Court of Stupas is surrounded on three sides by open alcoves or chapels. As a proof, that it was in the past occupied by the Buddhists and Hindu races, coins of those periods are still found at the site. The monks constructed it for their convenience.this is too old and in danger position so proper preservation and attention to this heritage place is needed.Government takes a lot of steps but it is not too much serious in action.This place brings a lot of employment oppurtunities to local people and also help the income of community.

  41. March 13th, 2009 1:31 am

    The site is a great source of information on Buddhism and the way of life people here used to follow. The village is built on the ruins of the ancient town, the foundation walls of which are still in a tolerably good formation. Spring water was supplied to them on hill tops; living quarters for ventilators for light and alcoves for oil lamps were made in the walls. From the description of Song Yun, a Chinese pilgrim, it appears that it was on one of the four great cities lying along the important commercial route to India. It was a well-fortified town with four gates outside the northern one, on the mound known as Chajaka Dehri which was a magnificent temple containing beautiful stone images covered in gold leaves.

  42. March 13th, 2009 1:35 am

    Pakistan is a melting pot of cultures and civilisations. And Gandhara, a northwestern province on the border with Afghanistan, is one of the most intriguing of them all. Walking through this former cradle of Buddhist faith, I felt a strong urge to protect whatever is still left of this once flourishing kingdom. I became interested in Buddha’s life at a young age,” he recalled. “It’s a passion, and I am happy to speak on what I have learned through these years about the Buddhist remains in Pakistan, especially Gandhara. Takht Bhai is four hours ride north of Islamabad. Along the way I enjoyed watching local people going about their daily chores and the scenery from the comfort of my bus. For tourists, Pakistan offers a vast landscape of amazing richness and variety. Each town and city has its own brand of lifestyle and a window to the past.Prservation is needed for this heritage site.It is important place for Buddha religion people to visit it and see.

  43. Naiema says:
    April 20th, 2009 11:06 am

    On the last week the month of August I visited to the ” Takht Bhai Buddhist Remains” located at Takht Bhai (District Mardan). The monastic complex was called Takht-i-Bahi because it was built atop a hill and also adjacent to a stream. Located 80 kilometers from Peshawar and 16 kilometers Northwest of the city of Mardan, Takht-I-Bahi was unearthed in early 20th century and in 1980 it was included in the UNESCO World Heritage list as the largest Buddhist remains in Gandhara, along with the Sahr-i-Bahlol urban remains that date back to the same period, located about a kilometer south. The place is extremely beautiful and historical.the site condition is very old and danger to collapse many thing in this site. The condition of old constructs are too bad and need immediate attention and prevention for coming tourists and visitors.

  44. Haroon says:
    April 23rd, 2009 7:36 am

    Teh Taliban killers will also destroy this… and any other signs of culture that remain

  45. Tajammal says:
    August 27th, 2011 12:24 pm

    The priceless ‘Fasting Bhudda’ statue was discovered from the same Takht- i- Bahi remains.

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