NED to NASDAQ: A success story of Pakistani diaspora

Posted on May 3, 2007
Filed Under >Owais Mughal, Education, Pakistanis Abroad
63 Comments
Total Views: 30803

Share

Owais Mughal

Measuring success is a relative term. A type of success where most people seem to agree is the success in one’s profession. Pakistan’s public universities and colleges, inspite of their little known world status, have repeatedly produced people who have excelled at all world forums. We have one such recent success to report where members of Pakistani diaspora; all with education from a public university of Pakistan; have excelled in their profession internationally.

The sucess story is of a hi-tech company in US which went public yesterday and got listed at NASDAQ. The Company’s name is Cavium Networks. It was co-founded in 2000 by Raghib Hussain, a graduate from NED University of Engineering and Technology Karachi. After the initial set-up, Raghib was joined by Amer Haider and Imran Badr; also the graduates of NED; who helped in establishing the marketing and software departments for the company respectively.

While many years of hardwork brought the success to these gentlemen and their team, the point to be noted is their roots of technical skills and education which was imparted to them in public institutions of Pakistan. I read it at PASHA (Pakistan Software Houses Assosiation) website that it is the story of people who are making it big from the corridors of NED university to Wall Street.

Up until 18-20 years ago, the three main characters of our success story, probably oblivious of each other’s existence, were studying at three different Government owned pre-engineering colleges of Karachi. Raghib went to Karachi’s Delhi Science College.

Photo to the left is a satellite image of Delhi College Karachi.

Amer Haider went to DJ (Dayaram Jethmal) Science college and Imran Badr went to Malir Cantt college. Good grades in their HSC exams got these gentlemen an admission into a public sector university (NED). Raghib was two years senior than Amer Haider and Imran Badr and went on to graduate as a Computer Systems Engineer in 1993.Amer Haider graduated as a Mechanical Engineer and Imran as an Electrical Engineer in 1995.

Despite graduating from the same university the paths of these three?gentlemen were still very different. Raghib started his career working at Zelin (Pvt.) Ltd., and then ITIM Associates in Karachi before moving to US.

Amer Haideralso started his technical and management career in Karachi with Wavetech and other local concerns before moving to the US.

Imran Badr worked in Karachi for 4 years with local companies and Reuters before moving to the US.

In US the newly founded company brought these gentlement together and the talent produced by Pakistan’s public sector educational institutes blossomed. Today Raghib is the company’s Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and VP for Software Engineering. Amer Haider is Director of Strategic Marketing and Ecosystem Development and Imran Badr is the Lead Software Architect.

In the photo above the three gentlemen standing from L to R are Amer Haider, Imran Badar and Raghib Hussain

Along the way,few more NEDians have been joined the team; specifically Faisal Masood, Syed Saadullah Hussain in Software and Sabahat Ashraf the lead technical writer. The total work force strength of the company has now grown up to 177.

Yesterday was a big day in this company’s history as it went public and we wish all the stakeholders good luck. We would also like to hear more stories of succes from you where Pakistani diaspora coming from Public institutions have done well in their profession. Please share your thoughts and experiences below.

Acknowledgements: Special thanks to iFaqeer who provided me with background material and two photos for this article.

63 Comments on “NED to NASDAQ: A success story of Pakistani diaspora”

  1. Tee Emm says:
    May 3rd, 2007 1:28 am

    And congrats to Noman Sahib and Ms Nilofer Master, the teachers that were close to RH at NED. They must have seen a glimpse of the future in these students!

  2. TURAB says:
    May 3rd, 2007 1:33 am

    Congratulations guys! we as a nation are very proud of you!

  3. Qaisrani says:
    May 3rd, 2007 4:50 am

    It is sad to see that their company (Cavium Networks) has a development center in India but not in Pakistan; the founders are Pakistani but they don’t believe in the talent of Pakistani engineers.

  4. Ali Choudhury says:
    May 3rd, 2007 5:47 am

    Pakistanis are very talented. But let’s face it, India is a much more stable and internationally accepted environment to do business in.

  5. Adnan Siddiqi says:
    May 3rd, 2007 6:50 am

    Intresting! The other software company which is listed in NASDAQ is Netsol IR.

    Intresting to read the one of them belonged to my college[Delhi college]

  6. YLH says:
    May 3rd, 2007 8:20 am

    Brilliant article Owais…

    Qaisrani… ever heard of Ricardo’s Principle in International Economics…

    Ali Chaudhry…

    I am afraid that is not it. A development center in India would probably be a business decision. As far as threat perception goes Pakistan is way higher than India … but actual threat levels are exactly the same.. according to most surveys… Foreign investment is as likely or unlikely to get torched and foreign lives as much safe or at risk in Pakistan as they are in India…

    We Pakistanis need not grant any perception issues when they are not rooted in reality.

  7. Rehan says:
    May 3rd, 2007 8:57 am

    I know Amer (went to school with him at Illinois), he has always been a smart, kind and driven person. I’m not surprise at his success. Bravo!

  8. Pervaiz Munir Alvi says:
    May 3rd, 2007 9:24 am

    Thank you Owais for highlighting this story and the role of Pakistani Public Universities in this success. Almost every American institution has few Pakistani professionals who have contributed to the collective success of that institution. Pakistani trained Doctors, Engineers, Professors all have brought good names to their colleges and universities in Pakistan. Your article decants reality from perception. YLH is right when he says here, “We Pakistanis need not grant any perception issues when they are not rooted in reality”. Let us hope that Ali Choudhury is listening to him. There is nothing that we as a nation are not capable of achieving. Believing in one self is the first step in that direction.

  9. Akif Nizam says:
    May 3rd, 2007 9:55 am

    Not exactly on topic but another prominent Pakistani-run public firm is Ethan Allen (where I bought most of my home furniture) whose CEO Farooq Kathwari hails from Kashmir (born in Indian Kashmir but raised in Mazaffarabad). He has a very interesting story as his 19-year old American-born son was recruited by the Jihadists and was killed back in 1992 either in Afghanistan or in Kashmir. A very interesting article on him back in 2001:

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/01_43/b3754076.htm

  10. Shahran Asim says:
    May 3rd, 2007 11:33 am

    Owais,

    I think it is the right post at right time. I this is really an achievement which we as Pakistanis , NEDIANs should be proud of. Most other achievements that pakistanis have done are in software development or manufacturing sectors.

    I think the team’s achievement is rare in the sense that the technology that they are working on is the cutting edge technology of the future (for example specialized single chip processors for broadband/ triple play audio voice and data applications). It requires real R&D investment to develop such an interesting product portfolio which is unprecedented among the Pakistani diaspora.

    Companies such as Cisco and IBM have been their customers who use their embedded chips in their products.

    As Owais mentioned earlier, I wish we would see more and more of these stories like that which could be a source of inspiration for a lot.

  11. Adnan Siddiqi says:
    May 3rd, 2007 12:43 pm

    It always makes me wonder why Pakistanis are not inclined in field of R&D? I am not talking about Engineering or Scinece only, there is no R&D culture in any field.

    How resources are wasted in Pakistan, I would like to share what’s happening at recently developed LEJ[latif ebrahim jamal] center which is equipped with high speed Internet,WiFi, wide electronic screens,online world libraries etc etc . One can attend the lectures of any topic by professors of different universities of world and KU/LEJ managment pays $200/lecture. Guess what? the center is being used for things like chatting,emailing and orkut. Noone is intrested to attend lectures. Students don’t attend lectures and managment run lecture on Electronic slides just for sake of “Khaana puri”. KU managment has been wasting $200/lecture and noone is asking about wastage. In presence of such environment, it’s stupidity to expect something good from our side. There was a time when we were good in agriculture research but it seems it’s also dead now. there was a time when 5/6 NED departments were able to produce something. Now there are 10+ or 15+ department and we hardly hear about any achivement.

  12. iFaqeer says:
    May 3rd, 2007 12:46 pm

    Qaisrani, believe me, Raghib and others have tried to set up shop in Pakistan. And you will have noticed the ITIM connection–Raghib, and I, and others were working in offshore software inside Pakistan years before most people had heard the phrase. And I am a great advocate of doing buiness in Pakistan. But the Pakistani market isn’t as predictable and as sure a bet as the Indian one for offshore operations. Like the early days of Indian offshoring, some folks succeed and others don’t. But we all keep trying.

    And the Indian connection for Cavium isn’t too far from home; the other founder of the company is a very down-to-earth Indian Muslim from Hyderabad named Syed B. Ali. Someone I, at least, as just as proud of.

    The one thing that doesn’t seem to have come through in the article above is the fact that Raghib is one of the first people to clearly and boldly state on his bio, even in SEC filings, that his background is solidly Pakistani, and solidly NED. Do a search of the SEC’s database on words like Pakistan, NED, etc. and see for yourself. (You can start at sec.gov–they have searchable databases.) So, in a lot of ways, his story is precisely the opposite of what you are complaining of; his is a story of confidence and pride in Pakistan, in being a Pakistani, and, I dare say, Pakistaniat.

    Unlike a lot of even the folks actually setting up shop in Pakistan just to get cheap labour, and not doing anything to help develop and support that labour force beyond giving them a salary, I see Raghib as part of the solution.

  13. May 3rd, 2007 1:17 pm

    Sweet!

    You guys rock!

    Take Care,

    Mudassir Azeemi,

    San Francisco,CA

  14. Anwar says:
    May 3rd, 2007 1:57 pm

    Heart warming. Proud of Amer, Imran and Raghib’s achievements – congratulations.
    And Adnan, you are correct about the absence of R&D culture but the truth is that most Pakistanis overseas succeeded not because of the education they received back home but inspite of it.

  15. May 3rd, 2007 2:47 pm

    This is great news and such people always make way for many others to do good as well.

    But I don’t see that successful entrepreneurship and creativity has much in common with public universities in Pakistan.

    Dont get me wrong, I do wish above all to see public universities the best education facilities in the country but somehow I feel the private universities have given more output in recent times and the best example is LUMS. I dont think money and funds has a lot to do with creating a strong academic culture, public universities in general are already lucky to get more focused students than private univs. But out of a batch of say 200, the usual 30-50 will make their way, the rest will be the usual average. And this is just about the general feel of every other university, either private or public.

    Somehow something is still missing. And a really bad thing to add to that is the emerging trend of alumni lobbying in Pakistan. U can find many companies, favorite with a particular univ. Some have more NEDians, some have more KU students, others have more FASTians. total crap!

    Just look at the faculty at public univs. Ive heard more incidents of politics for new upbeat faculty at public univs. than anywhere else. most of them feel so dejected, they reject the whole country and fly away….most of them, again!

  16. Jinni says:
    May 3rd, 2007 4:02 pm

    I took a look at their website. Except Raquib, everyone else is an Indian. So, I am not sure if this is a Pakistani success or an Indian Success! Am I the spoiler here??

    Syed Ali, President & CEO (Indian Muslim),
    Zaheer Syed, Vice President of Operations (Indian Muslim)
    Rajiv Khemani, Vice President of Marketing and Sales (Indian Hindu)
    Anil Jain, Vice President of IC Engineering & Co-Founder (Indian Hindu)

  17. Owais Mughal says:
    May 3rd, 2007 4:19 pm

    Jinni, I think we don’t wanna give this article any communal bias. Indian Hindus or Pakistani muslims or any other communities are equally talented. Point we are trying to make is the Pakistani diaspora coming out of public sector educational institutes played a big part in this success. This is not to belittle contribution from any other nationalities.

  18. Kamala says:
    May 3rd, 2007 4:36 pm

    Another Pakistani success story is Umair Khan of Chowk and Wordwalla fame.

  19. Desichef says:
    May 3rd, 2007 5:22 pm

    When we talk about how proud these young men have made their alma maters, one must pause to think what they have done for the institution that got them where they are. In the US most top colleges have huge endowment funds that most alumni contribute to. Theses endowments pay for scholarships, development and promoting the institute. If all the successful Pakistani doctors and engineers in America started paying back to the one source that made them what they are their alma maters, instead of just khali khali feeling proud, Pakistan would be a much better country.

  20. Jinni says:
    May 3rd, 2007 5:56 pm

    Owais,

    It was iFaqeer who is harping on the communal aspect and I simply maginified it. He simply ignored or overlooked the other communities from South Asia that were part of the success as well. That is all.

    I quote ifaqeer

    “….And the Indian connection for Cavium isn’t too far from home; the other founder of the company is a very down-to-earth Indian Muslim from Hyderabad named Syed B. Ali. Someone I, at least, as just as proud of”.

    I would call this a success for all South Asians.

    Jinni

  21. Ashfaque says:
    May 3rd, 2007 6:32 pm

    I think that you raise teh exact right issue here… there are actauly lots and lots of sucessful Pakistanis all over teh world and in Pakistan itself but we really do not have a tradition of giving back to our institutions… My respect for these guys will happen when I see them giving back something to their country

    adil

  22. Muhammad Aurangzeb Akhtar says:
    May 3rd, 2007 7:33 pm

    I wonder why the company does not have any offshore offices in Pakistan but rather in India ?

  23. MK says:
    May 4th, 2007 12:42 am

    There is a big confusion in this artical. No offense to the person who provided this information but he seems to be biased towards Amer Haider and Imran Badr. I know this company right from the first day and I know that Syed Ali and Raghib Hussain are the only Founders. Other two folks mentioned in the artical did not even join the company until after funding. We should pay some respect to the founders. For those of you who do not know, founders are the original people who start the company and most of the time work initial months without any pay. These are the original visionaries and take most risk and therefore deserve a big credit for the success.

  24. Sikander says:
    May 4th, 2007 1:06 am

    I also want to mention that folks are missing the basic point here. What makes Cavium Networks unique for Pakistan and NED is that it is the first company in hi-tech sector which went public and had Pakistani Founder from NED.

    Jinni, you are confused. It is equally an Indian and Pakistani success story. As I said earlier Raghib and Syed Ali are the ONLY two FOUNDERS. Syed is business leader (CEO) and Raghib is the technology leader (CTO). If you live in Silicon Valley you will realize that people here think above religious and national difference. This is one of the key reasons for their success.

    Qaisrani, the basic principal of business is to make the decisions in the best interest of the business. I know Cavium team and they will never make decisions with personal preferences. This is one of the key reasons that Cavium is a successful company. I am also aware that Raghib has funded at least three independent R&D houses in Pakistan in three different product areas with his personal money and not associated with Cavium Networks. Note that it is a matter of discipline to keep business interests independent from personal preferences.

    Kamala, you are comparing glass with diamond. There is no comparison between Wordwalla and Cavium Networks. I am not saying that Wordwalla was a complete flop but its exit was more of an asset sale where as Cavium Networks achieved the highest success a startup can achieve which is a successful
    IPO. You probably missed their presentation at retailroadshow.com and have not gone through their website. Today, Cavium Networks has a market cap of about $700million. Cavium Networks is not only the leader in
    security sector but is also a leading supplier of “the state of the art technology” to “Who-is-Who” in the Networking and Communication Industry.

    Desichef, you have a good point but do you know that most successful people are very busy and endowment funds that alumni members contribute to are a result of independent organization’s campaign. I hope NED Alumni can do something like that. I have no doubt most of these successful engineers will contribute. Do you know that Raghib is also one of the original founders and supporter of Koshish Organization, a non-profit organization focused to providing educational resources to people in the less privileged parts of the world? check http://www.koshish.org for their projects in Pakistan.

  25. Qaisrani says:
    May 4th, 2007 2:53 am

    iFaqeer, Sikandar: I am working in a high-tech US company’s R&D center in Pakistan. The company has its development centers in India as well as in Pakistan. The engineering cost in Pakistan is half than that in India and the company is greatly appreciative of the performance of Pakistani engineers.
    When this US company with all its executives from US can have an R&D center in Pakistan, why Cavium Networks can’t have. I hope Cavium people will think of opening its next offshore R&D center in Pakistan.

  26. libertarian says:
    May 4th, 2007 11:19 am

    Qaisrani: When this US company with all its executives from US can have an R&D center in Pakistan, why Cavium Networks can’t have

    Because Syed Ali (the CEO) is from Hyderabad (India) and is familiar with it. Hyderabad (also Chennai, Pune, Gurgaon, NOIDA) is growing like crazy and the costs are less than Bangalore.

    The issue is not just cost though – companies weigh depth of local talent-pool, scalability of operations, and history of IP protection. Like it or not outsourcing to India is now an accepted best practice (VCs in Silicon Valley expect an India strategy when you raise money) – you won’t get fired for it. Outsource to Pakistan and you’re on your own.

  27. Ali Choudhury says:
    May 4th, 2007 12:16 pm

    To clarify, I’m not saying Pakistan is a much worse place to do business in than India. However the common Western perception is that it’s an unstable dictatorship on the verge of being taken over by Al Qaeda sympathisers. They don’t realise it’s a country of 160 million people where FATA\Waziristan is well, well away from the Punjab-Sindh corridor, the talent available is high-quality and cheap and the biggest obstacles to business are the ones affecting Third World countries everywhere.

    I emailed the Economist’s South Asia editor about why his publication and others never talked about Pakistan’s good prospects. He said the main interest in it will always be terrorism-related since that’s what their readers are interested in.

    Thus it’s relatively easy to get unknowledgeable investors, customers and suppliers on-board if you say you’re sourcing work to India but as far as they know, we’re another Somalia.

  28. Babar says:
    May 4th, 2007 4:32 pm

    Owais – great job in starting this series, hope to read more on this topic in coming days.

  29. Aqil Sajjad says:
    May 4th, 2007 4:32 pm

    “I emailed the Economist’s South Asia editor about why his publication and others never talked about Pakistan’s good prospects. He said the main interest in it will always be terrorism-related since that’s what their readers are interested in.”

    I wonder what the nationality of their south asia editor is?

    In any case, this is a pretty dumb explanation. Even if the main interest of the readers is terrorism related, it is the media’s duty to highlight important things that have escaped public attention.

    Take the example of Pakistan’s English dailies, not everything they publish about social issues is in high demand, yet they do print that kind of material out of a sense of social responsibility and have still not gone out of business as a result.

  30. Aqil Sajjad says:
    May 4th, 2007 4:51 pm

    I have no personal experience of the IT industry, but
    I am told that outsourcing to India is not as smooth as it is often made out to be. From what I have heard, not all Indian IT graduates are bombshells, in fact most of them are average, and many frustrating mistakes are also made in outsourcing projects before preparing a final product.
    Basically, India had two main advantages: the first mover’s advantage and the fact that it has a large number of graduates. Now that India has already made a name for itself, Pakistan, being a late starter, is finding it hard to catch up, and this has naturally become more difficult after 911 due to our serious image problem.

    Pakistanis who think India’s IT success is due to its democracy are also grossly mistaken, it’s got more to do with visionary leadership. If any of our earlier leaders (civilian or military) had invested a bit in education and if Bhutto had not nationalized the industry, things might have turned out differently for us too regardless of the crisis with democracy.

  31. Eidee Man says:
    May 4th, 2007 4:58 pm

    [quote comment="46249"]I have no personal experience of the IT industry, but
    I am told that outsourcing to India is not as smooth as it is often made out to be. From what I have heard, not all Indian IT graduates are bombshells, in fact most of them are average, and many frustrating mistakes are also made in outsourcing projects before preparing a final product.
    Basically, India had two main advantages: the first mover’s advantage and the fact that it has a large number of graduates. Now that India has already made a name for itself, Pakistan, being a late starter, is finding it hard to catch up, and this has naturally become more difficult after 911 due to our serious image problem.

    Pakistanis who think India’s IT success is due to its democracy are also grossly mistaken, it’s got more to do with visionary leadership. If any of our earlier leaders (civilian or military) had invested a bit in education and if Bhutto had not nationalized the industry, things might have turned out differently for us too regardless of the crisis with democracy.[/quote]

    Yes, as always, I find it hard to disagree with Aqil. India’s success in this area is largely attributable to some of its good policies on education. I’m no fan of India, but one must acknowledge the great job they have done in building and maintaining the IITs, for example. THIS, and not governmental reforms, is their core strength.

    Also, I find the Economist editor’s comments completely absurd. He’s basically giving the same excuses tabloids give to publish garbage. This reminds me of a Wall Street Journal article published in March 2003 on the World Cup match between Pakistan and India. It was written by an Indian and was insanely derogatory towards Pakistanis.

  32. Afaq says:
    May 5th, 2007 4:20 pm

    I think people are right in saying that we shoudl care more about the colleges we went to in Pakistan when we succeed. But also the colleges shoudl go out of their wayto find their successful graduates and honor them, that way the links will bemaintained

  33. Kamala says:
    May 4th, 2007 6:25 pm

    [quote post="692"]I’m no fan of India,[/quote]

    I have a question for you Eidee Man, why do you say that?
    I’m of Indian origin. I love this blog and the discussions on it. It helps me learn so much about Pakistan-its culture, history, music, and of course food.
    Let me first at the outset clarify where I am coming from. I was born in South India(post partition generation), and grew up with none of the hangups a lot of my North Indian compatriots have about Pakistan.I regret that my schooling did not equip me with much knowledge about your great country,but thankfully did not prejudice me in anyway against it; so when I did have a opportunity to interact with Pakistanis in the United States, I could do so with an open mind. In fact Professor Najam,who taught me, was one of the first Pakistanis I interacted with.
    Yes, I have heard most of the arguments about why the two countries have such a tortured history ; but it has been over sixty years since partition.And yes, I’ve also heard all the arguments about how my compatriots often provoke fights, are pompous, and generally act despicably.Arguments that are justified in many cases.
    Here is my one cent take on Pakistan- India relations:as countries, we spent sixty years pointing fingers and being belligerent, and where has that got us?
    India-Pakistani relations need not be a zero-sum game. Whether we like it or not our countries are neighbors and if Europeans with their history of wars and mutual animosities can bury their differences, why cannot India and Pakistan?
    I guess, the point I am trying to make is that people make up countries and if people like us can get over mutual suspicions, do you think we have a future where the real issues of poverty and disease and illiteracy can be tackled?
    I cannot speak for everyone, but here is one Indian holding out her hand in friendship ( no strings attached) to you and any Pakistani who might want to grasp it.

  34. mahi says:
    May 4th, 2007 6:54 pm

    [quote comment="46249"]
    Basically, India had two main advantages: the first mover’s advantage and the fact that it has a large number of graduates. Now that India has already made a name for itself, Pakistan, being a late starter, is finding it hard to catch up, and this has naturally become more difficult after 911 due to our serious image problem.
    [/quote]

    You missed out the biggest one really: English language. Cost savings, every third world nation can provide, so no comparitive advantage there.
    And the other less visible advantage is a large group of now established professionals in corporate America with ties to India.

  35. Owais Mughal says:
    May 4th, 2007 10:45 pm

    Kamala, your sentiments are equally shared by many of us. Your comment is well written and understood.

  36. Eidee Man says:
    May 5th, 2007 1:25 am

    [quote comment="46261"][quote post="692"]I’m no fan of India,[/quote]

    I have a question for you Eidee Man, why do you say that?[/quote]

    Well, I have Indian friends here too and I never said I was anti-Indian. I, too, used to believe that there was a sort of kinship between people from the subcontinent. However, as I have grown more mature, I have come to the realization that the Indian government and a lot of Indian people do not wish Pakistan well.

    You can say the same about Pakistan, and yes, you would be correct. But I think there is MUCH less negativity from the Pakistanis side.

    As a simple example, just go to Google News and search for Pakistan. You will undoubtedly find that ALL of the negative stories that have inflammatory and needlessly inciting headlines are from Indian media outlets.

    Again, I hope Pakistan and India will make peace very soon and settle the Kashmir issue. But, I would be very skeptical of a special bond between India and Pakistan. I think we would be better served if we pursued our traditional allies instead.

  37. sarmad says:
    May 5th, 2007 3:43 am

    We must be proud of them all, however, I hope they can do more to nurture the talent of Pakistani Engineers (residing in Pakistan)

  38. sarmad says:
    May 5th, 2007 3:51 am

    For God sake please avoid dragging India/Pakistan battle over here! Its irrelavent!

  39. May 5th, 2007 3:56 am

    congratulations for the awesome achievements !!

  40. MQ says:
    May 5th, 2007 4:42 am

    I am surprised, and amused, that this post is fast turning into the usual India-Pakistan debate and “mine is better” game that people sometime play. The post is about a successful individual in America who happens to be of Pakistani origin. Good for him! One hopes that more NEDians and more Pak-Americans follow into his footsteps.

    I just looked up the website of this company. From their names and biodata one could tell that 4 out of 7 people listed on their team, including the president and CEO, are of Indian origin, two sound like American-Americans, and one (Raghuib Hussain) is of Pakistani Origin.

    So where did this India vs Pakistan thing crept into the discussion?

  41. Adnan Siddiqi says:
    May 5th, 2007 5:32 am

    Fine, Indians are our rivals for last 60 years but lets face it that they did perform well this is why they are part of every big IT comapny and hold high posts; whether it’s SUN,Oracle, Microsoft,Google, you just name it! But these guys are not some supermen. Whatever they achieved was only possible due to solid policies,infrastructure which was provided by Nehru and later governments. Plus Indians are good at Maths and Physics and If I remember right, there is some theory/law too in field of AStronmy, i think called ‘Chandra’ something. Anyways, Pakistanis are not aliens and they are very much talented. Due to lack of infrastructure as well as lack of Appreciation by their own peers stops them to come forward.

  42. Kamala says:
    May 5th, 2007 7:01 am

    [quote post="692"]For God sake please avoid dragging India/Pakistan battle over here! Its irrelavent![/quote]

    Point taken Sarmad.

  43. Naveed A. says:
    May 5th, 2007 5:00 pm

    GOOD ROLE MODELS ARE ALWAYS IMPORTANT IN SOCIETY

    We actually have lots but usually do not give them credit. Good we are doing that here

  44. libertarian says:
    May 5th, 2007 12:07 pm

    Kamala: I’ve also heard all the arguments about how my compatriots often provoke fights, are pompous, and generally act despicably. Arguments that are justified in many cases.

    Please don’t apologize for all Indians. That’s presumptuous of you. You do all the hand-washing you want and extend hands in friendship. But I resent being put down by you (as those “people from the North”) just so you can be conciliatory.

  45. MK says:
    May 5th, 2007 1:58 pm

    This debate lost the main idea of this artical. Please do not turn it into political issue. It is getting to my nerves.

  46. HJ says:
    May 9th, 2007 6:53 am

    Guys,

    So WHAT if the company has Pakistanis AND Indian founders and key executives. By no means does this take anything away from the Pakistani boys. They have done well – and yes, good role models are important.

    I wonder when we’ll get away from this us versus them mentality. Unlike the rubbish we were taught in Pakistan Studies, our identity is not “we are not Indians.” In a globalized world, sooner than later, we’d realize that we have to break the molds set in school.

    I question the wisdom of taking their business public ;-) But I can only admire that these guys – no women?? – have broken down barriers and boundaries and reaffirmed my faith that small individual steps can make bigger changes happen over time.

    Not to take any credit from NED but Dayaram Jethmal Government Science College is a fine and very underrated institution in Karachi. I still have fond memories of DJ (and Khushal Khan’s canteen) where I did everything except study :-)

    HJ

  47. Indian Bhai says:
    May 9th, 2007 10:33 pm

    To answer your question regarding why Cavium opened its offshore site in India. One of the founders Syed Ali is from Hyderabad, India. A number of the senior managers (anil jain, zaheer sayeed) are also from India. but youre right, india is a well developed IT outsourcing destination these days.

  48. Sajjad says:
    May 10th, 2007 8:05 am

    Just Imagine, InfoSYS Acquires TPS, Wipro Acquires Axact. Kashmir will be automatically resolved. Its game of economy and Survival these days. The Great megers can really bring even Nations Closer.

  49. Adnan Siddiqi says:
    May 11th, 2007 1:14 am

    Sajjad,too much capitalism is not good for health. And sorry your idea is very weak and can’t be implemented.

    BTW,Wipro acquire Axact? why would Wipro like to defame itself.Don’t we know what kinda ‘projects’ they do?

  50. Arif Shamim says:
    May 17th, 2007 1:27 am

    Well done, guys! There is still hard work ahead.

    Securing several rounds of continued funding for start-ups in Silicon Valley requires technical capabilities, astute planning and management skills. Taking public requires extensive work on part of founders, business folks and VCs. This story success has many players than just the founders. Regardless, founders are the commendable visionaries and hence rewarded deservingly and amply. These guys made all the right moves.

    This story again highlights the beauty of our bayarea where ideas are turned into reality, irrespective of who you are and where you are from.

    Congrats!

  51. Murad Ali says:
    May 23rd, 2007 1:33 am

    Good Luck for all team members …
    Remember . . .
    You have much more to do
    Keep it up . . .

    Surely, Brother Raghib made a symbol for us . .

    I am too NEDian and Dehlin too . . .
    Thats why I felt a bit proudy, reading this article.

    Regards
    Murad Ali
    Software Engineer
    BCIT (NED) Batch 2001-02
    MCIT (NED) Batch 2005-06

  52. Reluctnt Expatriate says:
    June 15th, 2007 3:27 pm

    I am so proud of these NED graduates. I hope that for once we do not criticize the good work and achievement which is hallmark of our nation.

    I have recently started a database of alumni of the University of Engineering and Technology (UET), Lahore. So far, I have information about 95 alumni who reside in USA. I was surprised by the amount of talent and contribution my fellow alumni have provided to USA. Ten of the alumni are full professors at US universities, one of them has been a police commissioner of Boston, several of them are presidents and CEOs of the companies they founded, others are leading technical experts in their field, one of them was cofounder of Ciena.

    Any UET graduates who may want to join the UET alumni association of USA can contact me at abdulhaisheikh@yahoo.com or visit website UETAlumni.net.

  53. Ayub says:
    July 1st, 2007 4:06 pm

    I watched Raghib on Geo, It feels great to watch talented Pakistani succeed. Keep up the good and hard work, Insha allah everybody will benefits.

  54. HASEEB KHAN says:
    August 25th, 2007 12:37 am

    GREAT !
    I must salute to owas mughal first ,whose efforts to find out those talented pakistanies in the lime light.Second i congrats to all above guys who make the difference,and make my country proud.Carry on!I pray to your success and prosperity and good name of pakistan .

  55. August 25th, 2007 2:43 am

    These guys are also talented Pakistanis. From earning a certification to running a PC manufacturing company, all are great.

  56. Engr Syed Arsalan Ahmed says:
    September 4th, 2007 11:59 am

    Great Work Done man

    hi iam Engr Syed Arsalan Ahmed from Yamah Motors karachi. I am an NEDian as well from the Batch 99-2000 i must SALUT you all for the best of your life.

    I MUST STAND UP AND GIVE YOU THE SALUT YOU ARE REAL HERO OF NED WE MUST PROUD OF YOU

    Bye.
    Karachi

  57. Owais Mughal says:
    September 8th, 2007 3:26 pm

    NEDians convention is currently going on in Silicon Valley and it can be seen Live Here

  58. Owais Mughal says:
    February 22nd, 2008 11:16 am

    Another Succes story:

    MUET graduate in world body

    Dr Illahi B. Shaikh, a graduate of the Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, has been elected as vice- president of the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage from Asia region. Details here

  59. Awais says:
    February 22nd, 2008 2:39 pm

    yes i can also tell u about the sucess story of some engineers from my university, UET Taxila, Tesla Technologies a company with foreign exports of about 4 million dollors per annum

  60. Owais Mughal says:
    February 22nd, 2008 2:51 pm

    Dear Awais, pls do tell us about Tesla technologies. May be we can feature them on these pages.

  61. Awais says:
    February 23rd, 2008 12:09 pm

    their website is http://www.tesla-tech.com/
    they fabricate the dispensers which were previously imported into pakistan for installation at CNG stations. They fabricate gas and electrical control devices and export them. They came from the mechanical engineering department of UET Taxila, as told by our teachers

  62. Owais Mughal says:
    March 13th, 2009 9:23 pm

    I was reading ‘Electronic Design’ magazine of Feb 09 when I came across this paragraph in an article on Home Networking. I was happily surprised to see Cavium Networks (and thus indirectly the NED talent :)) mentioned there in following words:

    “Celeno and Cavium Networks collaborated on a solution that transmits 1080p 60-Hz HDMI over Wi-Fi. Celeno’s CL3100 802.11n chip uses 4×4 MIMO to maximize speed and range. It works with the Cavium CNW3602 PureVu video processor, an H.264 compression chip, to deliver 480p/720p/1080p at 60 Hz over long distances, achieving sub-frame latency and perceptual lossless video quality.”

  63. saad says:
    May 25th, 2009 6:37 am

    iam really proud to hear that nedians are doing a great job all over the world , but iam really concerned about the market here in Pakistan , people doing such a great job abroad must try to divert the market here in Pakistan, so that engineers here must not have to go abroad and do the same thing, instead companies like these should pick up good students from here and make them work here. in this way not only students will be benefitted but also new tehnology will be introduced at a much low cost.
    thanks

Have Your Say (Bol, magar piyar say)