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Lyrics of Pakistan’s First National Anthem

Posted on April 19, 2010
Filed Under >Adil Najam, History, People, Poetry
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Adil Najam

Back in June 2009 I had first written by Prof. Jagan Nath Azad, who had been asked by the Quaid, Mr. Mohammed Ali Jinnah, to write the very first national anthem of Pakistan. Prof. Azad’s Aé sarzameené paak was, in fact, Pakistan’s first national anthem, until it was later replaced by the current anthem. Prof. Jagan Nath Azad, a Punjabi Hindu, later migrated to India but remained a staunch advocate of Indo-Pakistan friendship (see videos here).

At that point I had not been able to find a copy of the full tarana and since then I as well as other readers have been eagerly looking for a copy. Today, reader Adil Mulki found one here and I am delighted to share it with our readers (thanks also to Heritage Online where it was posted; Reader Shahid now alerts me that thanks are also due to ATP friend Beena Sarwar who originally uncovered this via Prof. Azad’s son Chander K. Azad, here):


An English transliteration is provided below for those who cannot read Urdu. I look forward to readers helping out with an actual translation.

Aye sar zameen-i-Pak

Zare tere hain aaj sitaron se tabnak
Roshan hai kehkashan se kahin aaj teri khak
Tundi-e-hasdan pe ghalib hai tera swaak
Daman wo sil gaya hai jo tha mudaton se chaak
Aye sar zameen-i-Pak!

Ab apne azm ko hai naya rasta pasand
Apna watan hai aaj zamane main sar buland
Pohncha sake ga is ko na koi bhi ab gazand
Apna alm a hai chand sitaron se bhi buland
Ab ham ko dekhtey hain atarad hon ya samaak
Aye sar zameen-i-Pak!

Utra hai imtehan main watan aaj kamyab
Ab huriat ki zulf nahin mahiv-e-paich-o-taab
Daulat hai apne mulk ki be had-o-be hisaab
Hon ge ham aap mulk ki daulat se faiz yab
Maghrib se hum ko khauf na mashriq se hum ko baak
Aye sar zameen-i-Pak!

Apne watan ka aaj badalne laga nizam
apne watan main aaj nahin hai koi ghulam
apna watan hai rah-e-taraqi pe tez gam
azad, bamurad jawan bakht shad kaam
ab itr bez hain jo hawain thin zehr naak
Aye sar zameen-i-Pak!

Zare tere hain aaj sitaron se tabnak
Roshan hai kehkashan se kahin aaj teri khak
Aye sar zameen-i-Pak!

P.S. Would it not be really wonderful if we could also find an audio recording from when it was the national anthem!

60 Comments on “Lyrics of Pakistan’s First National Anthem”

  1. Junaid says:
    April 19th, 2010 11:08 pm

    Very nice find. Was looking for this since I first read about this here at ATP.

  2. SA says:
    April 19th, 2010 11:26 pm

    Great find, I have heard few lines of it before but to read the whole anthem is wonderful, and yeah if we can combine it with an audio will make it awesome!!

  3. Asfand Siddiqui says:
    April 19th, 2010 11:29 pm

    Beautiful.

  4. Watan Aziz says:
    April 19th, 2010 11:43 pm

    There is something about a national anthem that stirs people.

    Great find.

    I guess, I need audio to relate to it.

    It is worded well. With good aims. I like the segment about sharing wealth. Wonder what the looters will have to say about it. It would have been funny to watch the looters sing the anthem. Maybe we should bring it back!

    I do however, like the current one. It has nice ring to it. Even though for a moment, just to get the billions and billions back, I would like to have the Jagan Nath version.

    If someone can find the audio, we should welcome the rascals with this one.

    Mai Jori Jamali will share my opinion.

  5. Watan Aziz says:
    April 19th, 2010 11:47 pm

    BTW, are you sure he does not have Kashmiri roots? Most of the Punjabis, especially from north side of Punjab have some Kashmiri links.

    And as my mother would say, “he has a Kashmiri nose”.

    Joy!

  6. Watan Aziz says:
    April 19th, 2010 11:52 pm

    Where is the ‘aks’ford’ Urdu to English dictionary when you need it.

    (That Urdu newspaper reporter who published the news about Urdu dictionary is going to be very sorry with me.)

  7. Majid says:
    April 20th, 2010 12:23 am

    In a recent famous Hasb-e-Haal program, it was told that this anthem was replaced by the presently adopted persian anthem of hafeez jalandhari due to a demand by ruling elite (establishment/ bureacracy) to write a quami trana in persian language to tribute to Iranian rulers which were at that time perhaps a role models for our ruling elite.
    This was perhaps the start of descent and a starting of our way apart from Quaid’s vision.

  8. سعد says:
    April 20th, 2010 1:22 am

    lovely lines…

  9. Vinnie says:
    April 20th, 2010 3:19 am

    Thats a very wonderful piece and the audio would also sound very good. Even reflective of the feelings that people would have at that time of independence. There is feeling of independence and hope for the bright future.

    Thats an Extraordinary one !

  10. ali hamdani says:
    April 20th, 2010 3:58 am

    Nice find. I remember reading a few lines of it earlier on ATP as well. This should be made more common today as we Pakistanis face a very tough time today due to terrorism. We must realize the importance of this country and secure this piece of land from militants. We owe to this country!

  11. April 20th, 2010 5:39 am

    Wow, Good to see the first (old) national anthem of our country. It also sounds really good but it’s not as good as the current national anthem. Thanks for making us aware of the first ever national anthem of our country.

  12. Natasha says:
    April 20th, 2010 7:19 am

    A national anthem written in the national language wouldve been a better choice.

  13. Roda says:
    April 20th, 2010 7:40 am

    Creation of Pakistan was due to economical oppression of Muslim.But after achieving the Independence the movement was high jacked.Our elders locked there houses in India when moving to Pakistan .They thought when thing get normal they will move back .Jinah had idea that the relation ship with India will be like USA/Canada .
    But every body know how we get trained by our gov.I can not forget the movement when i was in class 7th the one day our teacher told us that now onward you need to learn Arabic and they hired teacher who was muazen in masjid who him self can not able to speak Arabic.
    The book was nicely printed and every student start trying to keep that teacher happy .This is how we passed that Arabic paper.
    Does our parents were not good Muslims.
    Still i can not understand that what is our relation with Arabs.Who pock there nose in our internal affairs now and then .
    I want this TARANA BACK.

  14. Mrs. Ashraf says:
    April 20th, 2010 8:01 am

    So glad you found this. Have been looking forward to reading it. Although I have to say, I prefer the current one much better. Although this is very nice as a national song, the grace of the current one is more.

  15. NIhari says:
    April 20th, 2010 8:02 am

    Atleast the national anthem is in our national language i.e. Urdu not Persian

  16. Hanif Q. says:
    April 20th, 2010 8:04 am

    BY the way, this story circulating that they wanted an anthem in Persian is nonsense. The current anthem is more Persianized but that was not the purpose. In fact, even this one is very Persianized. That is just how these poets wrote.

  17. Watan Aziz says:
    April 20th, 2010 9:03 am

    Well, as it turns out, there is one more anthem that **only** the choor and the usurpers of Pakistan sing.

    Here it is, the leaked version:
    National Anthem of Usurpers and Looters

    Pak sir mary zamin shadbad
    Kishwar-e-haseen shadbad
    Tu nishan-e-azam-e-bun’dookistan
    arz-e-Pakistan
    Markaz-e-bank shadbad.

    Pak sir zamin ka muraba
    quwat-e-akhuwat-e-afwaj
    Qaum, mulk, sultanat
    sub hamarie hain
    shadbad manzil-e-buildings.

    Parcham-e-sitara-o-hilal
    Rahbar-e-rupia-o-da’llar
    Tarjuman-e-mary shan-e-hall
    jan-e-Swiss-number
    Mera hay Khuda-e-paisa-jalal.

    Now, I know this pushes the paper too far, but we have Pakistanis dying everyday. That is the real hurt.

    Swamps need to drained.

    Violence as a solution needs to be rejected.

    I want Jinnah’s Pakistan.

  18. Ammar says:
    April 20th, 2010 9:21 am

    History in Pakistan has always been distorted, Jinnah did not envision a Pakistan where religious bigots called the shots and sectarian outfits flourished. The religious indoctrination is the root cause of Taliban rise. Pakistan must revert back to its roots of secularism, peaceful coexistence and democratic governance. People should be the one to form the social contract not the clergy.

  19. Watan Aziz says:
    April 20th, 2010 10:58 am

    Folks, I apologize, the recording was scratchy, the last line should have been:

    sara-e-paisa-mulk say bahr

  20. Salman says:
    April 20th, 2010 12:14 pm

    Our current tarana is a manufactured one..

    this one was right from the heart.. it wasn’t meant to “serve a purpose” ..

    can u even imagine a muslim leader would ask a hindu to write the national anthem of an “islamic republic” ???

    and can u imagine a hindu so grateful for Pakistan ??? did he participate in the shouting of “pakistan ka matlab kya …” ?

    what is this nonsense.. how can we justify the creation of Pakistan if a hindu was so happy about its creation.. the way we know hindus are according to our text books… “baniay” .. “shatir”.. and what not..

    this kind of history should be burned.. buried .. forgotten.. our manufactured history is so much more soothing …

  21. Haider says:
    April 20th, 2010 3:17 pm

    English translation of this is available at:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qaum%C4%AB_Tar%C4%81na

    I find this one as complicated as the current official one. I guess that was the style of the poets in those days. With 25-odd lines, it will take a long time to recite.

  22. Anwer says:
    April 20th, 2010 5:50 pm

    >>Haider says
    >> I find this one as complicated as the current official one

    Can you explain what you mean by “complicated”? Any examples of what would be considered “not complicated”?

  23. Basheer Asad says:
    April 20th, 2010 10:08 pm

    Very glad that yo were able to find this and thank you for sharing.

    I like it, but it is not really a national anthem, since it is much more written for right after independence rather than for all times (which is what anthems are). Between them, I also like the current anthem much better and quite elegant in music as well as words. But as a national song I hope GEO or someone will have it sung.

    Qoowat-i-Akhowat-i-Awam

  24. April 21st, 2010 1:39 am

    Thanks Adil. I posted the translation soon after uploading the scan of the nazm that Chander K. Azad sent me. It’s at my blog, translated by Shoaib Mir http://beenasarwar.wordpress.com/2010/04/09/jagan-nath-azads-pakistan-tarana/

  25. Ammar says:
    April 22nd, 2010 3:07 am

    From censoring Jinnah speeches, hiding his true accounts and changing the national anthem, the religious zealots started meddling with the affairs of state since its very inception. We need to undo the mistakes of past. Firstly by defining religion strictly as spiritual domain and separating it from politics. Until we remove clergy from power politics we will see the like of Sufi Muhammad and Mullah Omer.

  26. Fawad says:
    April 22nd, 2010 5:10 pm

    Adil / Beena, as someone who fundamentally believes in separation of religion and state I viscerally like the idea that a Hindu may have been asked by the secular founder of the nation to write the country’s anthem. Also, I like Jagan Nath Azad’s heartfelt poem, particularly as it was written at a time of such communal madness.

    However, I want to inject a note of skepticism. In his writings Jagan Nath Azad mentioned penning this poem and its broadcast from Radio Pakistan but himself never seems to have claimed that Jinnah asked him to write it as a national anthem. He was based in Lahore at the time and Jinnah arrived and was in Karachi on August 14th/15th. How and when they would have communicated on this topic is not clear. It would be good to find some documentary or other evidence for that claim before perpetuating something as fact just because we want to believe it.

    Secondly, liking particular poetry and music is up to individual taste and I find this entire debate of Hafeez Jallundhari’s anthem as Persian and/or synthetic and Azad’s poem as natural rather silly. The problem is that the Pakistani educated class simply doesn’t know good Urdu and nothing in the national anthem or Azad’s poetry is difficult for those who know the language. For those who don’t they are both difficult so just because Hafeez Jallundhari is seen as right wing and not likable he seems to now get attacked for reasons good and bad. Azad should be rightly praised and given credit for a work from the heart but denigrating the current anthem should not be a natural corollary. I personally happen to like the current national anthem but its almost beside the point.

    Full disclosure: my father who is a retired professor was friendly with Hafeez Jallundhari and even I have met him as a child. I don’t think that jaundices my opinion but it may.

  27. Obaid1 says:
    April 23rd, 2010 12:47 am

    GEO’s 50 Minutes will discuss this issue tonight. Watch and comment here.

  28. Salman says:
    April 23rd, 2010 4:00 pm

    @Fawad:

    Azad has claimed about Jinnah’s personal request in an interview of his sometime ago .. I’ve read it myself a few years back.. but couldn’t get the link on google yet.. its probably the same interview that is referred to in the Daily Times article the earlier blog post here has referenced..

    And the issue with Hafiz Jalandhari vs Jagannath is not of poetry, or personal taste.. its about the whole mindset of eliminating Jinnah from Pakistan’s fundamental values.. which started right from the circumstances in which he was left to die ..

    the change of the anthem .. the objectives resolution.. these are all just the visible symptoms of what was underlying.. this is not about Hafiz Jalandhari.. and in the context of this discussion I don’t think anybody attacks the poet !

  29. Salman says:
    April 23rd, 2010 4:30 pm
  30. Obaid1 says:
    April 23rd, 2010 7:16 pm
  31. Watan Aziz says:
    April 23rd, 2010 9:36 pm

    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak

    Zare tayray hain aaj sitaron say tabnak
    Roshan hai kehkishan say ka’hin aaj teri khakk
    Tundi-e-hasdan pay hai ghalib tera swaak
    Daman wo sill gaya hai jo tha mudat’toon say chaak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Abb apne aazm ko hai naya rasta pasand
    Apna watan hai aaj zamanay main sir buland
    Ponhcha sakay ga is ko na koi bhi ab gazand
    Apna alam hai chand sitaron say bhe buland
    Abb ham ko daykhtay hain atarad ho ya samaak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Utra hai imtehan main watan aaj kamm’yaab
    Abb huriat key zulf nahin mahiv-e-paich-o-taab
    Daulat hai apne mulk key bay’hudd-o-bay’hisaab
    Hon’gay hum aapp mulk key daulat say faiz’yaab
    Maghrib say hum ko khauff na mushriq say hum ko baak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Apnay watan ka aaj badalnay laga nizam
    Apnay watan main aaj nahin hai koi ghulam
    Apnay watan hai rah-e-taraqi pay tez’gham
    Azad, ba’murad, jawan bakth shad’kaam
    Abb ittr bez hain, jo hawain thien zehyr naak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Zare tayray hain aaj sitaron say tabnak
    Roshan hai kehkishan say ka’hin aaj teri khakk
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    This is my rendition.

    As there is no standard on transliteration, I tried to make it as close to the sound as possible and fixed a few minor transpositions.

    A gratitude for Jagan Nath Azad.

  32. Anwer says:
    April 24th, 2010 2:32 am

    Pakistan’s National Anthem

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qaum%C4%AB_Tar%C4%81na

    The Qaumī Tarāna (Urdu: قومی ترانہ) is the National Anthem of Pakistan. The words “Qaumi Tarana” in Urdu literally translate to “National Anthem”. The Pakistani national anthem is unique in that its music preceded its lyrics. At independence, on August 14, 1947, Pakistan did not have a national anthem. When the flag was hoisted at the independence ceremony it was accompanied by the song, “Pakistan Zindabad, Azadi Paendabad”. The flag itself had only been approved by the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan three days earlier.[1][2][3] Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, asked Lahore-based Hindu writer, Jagannath Azad on August 9, 1947 to write a national anthem for Pakistan in five days.[4][5] The anthem written by Azad was quickly approved by Jinnah, and it was played on Radio Pakistan.[6] Azad’s work remained as Pakistan’s national anthem for approximately eighteen months, despite competition from a rival attempt by B.T. Baghar. The current national anthem of Pakistan was written by a Muslim writer named Abu-Al-Asar Hafeez Jullundhri.

    Composition

    In early 1948, A. R. Ghani from Transvaal, South Africa, offered two prizes of five thousand rupees each for the poet and composer of a new national anthem. The prizes were announced through a Government press note published in June 1948. In December 1948, a National Anthem Committee (NAC) was formed, initially chaired by the Information Secretary, Sheikh Muhammad Ikram. Committee members included several politicians, poets and musicians such as Abdur Rab Nishtar, Ahmed Chagla and Hafeez Jullundhri. The committee had some difficulty at first in finding suitable music and lyrics.

    In 1950, the impending state visit of the Shah of Iran resulted in the Government asking the NAC to submit an anthem without delay. The committee chairman, Federal Minister for Education, Fazlur Rahman, asked several poets and composers to write lyrics but none of the submitted works were deemed suitable. The NAC also examined several different tunes and eventually selected the one presented by Chagla and submitted it for formal approval. Chagla produced the musical composition in collaboration with another committee member and assisted by the Pakistan Navy band.[7]
    The music of the anthem was composed by Ahmed Ghulamali Chagla, with lyrics written by Abu-Al-Asar Hafeez Jullundhri. The three stanza composition was officially adopted in 1954. However, the music for the anthem had been composed in 1950 and had been used on several occasions before official adoption. The lyrics allude to a “Sacred Land” referring to Pakistan and a “Flag of the Crescent and Star” referring to the national flag. Unofficially, the anthem is sometimes referred to by its first line “Pāk sarzamīn shād bād” (Urdu: “Blessed be the sacred land”). The national anthem is played during any event involving the hoisting of the flag, for example Pakistan Day (March 23) and Independence Day (August 14).

    The anthem without lyrics was performed for Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan and later for the National Anthem Committee on August 10, 1950.[8] Although it was approved for playing during the visit of the Shah, official recognition was not given until August 1954.[8] The anthem was also played during the Prime Minister’s visit to the United States. The NAC distributed records of the composed tune amongst prominent poets, who responded by writing and submitting several hundred songs for evaluation by the NAC. Eventually, the lyrics written by Jullundhri were approved and the new national anthem was first played properly on Radio Pakistan on August 13, 1954.[9] Official approval was announced by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting on August 16, 1954. The composer Chagla had however died in 1953, before the new national anthem was officially adopted. In 1955 there was a performance of the national anthem involving eleven major singers of Pakistan including Ahmad Rushdi.[10]

  33. Watan Aziz says:
    April 26th, 2010 11:01 pm

    ATP, minor correction.

    Dr. Jagan Nath Azad was not Punjabi, but a Kashmiri, born in Isakhel in Pakistan. And like all Kashmiris, (the great Allam being one of them) will always be know as Kashmiris, no matter where they are born.

    A Kashmir will always be a Kashmiri. Place of birth is a minor detail to be ignored. And I am eternally grateful to my mother to giving me the insight on how to spot a Kashmiri! The famous ‘na’ak’!

    With that, here is the letter of his son:

    From: chander k. azad
    Date: Mon, Sep 7, 2009 at 10:23 PM
    Subject: info on Dr Jagan Nath Azad
    To: beena.sarwar@…
    September 6, 2009

    Dear Beena ji,

    Read with interest your piece (peace) in Kashmir Times Sep., 06,’09 (Neighbours in peace – or pieces?).

    Kudos for being an Indian agent. Might console you to know that there are millions of Pakistani agents on this side. Yes, we are agents of humanity, peace and posess no hard feelings !!! only respect and love for all and with an eye on the future. The past is gone. Remember only the good things of the past. Forget the rest. Bury the hatchet.

    Your objectivity is what I admire. No taking sides for the sake of it. Heart of it, most of us (detached of political or fanatic cues), are peace loving , humane and gregarious. I hope your mention of Pakistani fallacies is matched by Indians in admitting blunders committed by Indian politicians against Pakistan. You mention Kargil by Pakistan. I say East Pakistan (Bangladesh) by India. Can that be condoned?

    You asked me about some biographical details of my father. Dad migrated to Delhi sometime mid-September 1947. But again returned to Lahore in October. However, his friends advised him against staying as they found it difficult to keep him safe due to worsening situation. He returned to Delhi with a refugee party.

    He joined “MILAP” (Urdu Daily) as Assistant Editor in November 1947. In 1950 he joined Ministry of Information & Broadcasting as Asstt. Editor (Urdu) Publications Division. Retired in 1977 as Director of Public Relations, Govt. of India, Srinagar, J & K, a key bureaucratic position he held for five years . During this period I was witness to history of the State of J & k being carved and his unchronicled sentinel contribution towards it. The poet in him got the breathing space in 1997 when he retired from Govt. service but was appointed as Professor and Head of Urdu Deptt. , Jammu University by Chief Minister Sheikh Mohd. Abdullah Sahib who candidly told him “ Hum apko Dilli Vapas jaane nahin denge.”

    During his lifetime my father authored and published around 73 books. He was recipient of hundreds of national and international awards including:
    1. Pakistan President Iqbal Medal (1979),
    2. Award of Emeritus Fellowship by Jammu University (1884 Till Life),
    3. Iqbal Award-Gold Medal & Citation, Iqbal Academy, Hyderabad (1987),
    4. Conferment of the degree of D. Lit. (Honoris Causa)by Kashmir University (1989),
    5. Soviet Land Nehru Award (1989),
    6. Conferment of the degree of D. Lit. (Honoris Causa)by Jammu University (1994),
    7. Conferment of degree of Ph. D on six scholars ‘on the life of Prof. Azad”.

    He is known to have visited Universities all over the Orient and the Occident to deliver extension lectures .
    If you desire, I can post you a copy of his Biography compiled by Prof. Assadulah Wani, Jammu University. You have to send me your postal address for that.

    ***His last manuscript (unpublished) “Roodad-e-Iqbal” has this preface by him, I quote,” anything on Iqbal after this has no meaning” The manuscript is with me and I do not know what to do with it.

    With regards and best wishes,
    Chander K Azad.
    108 / 5, Greater Kailash , Jammu,
    J & k. -180011

    (copied without permission)

  34. Watan Aziz says:
    April 29th, 2010 10:40 pm

    O, Blessed Land of the Pure

    O, Blessed Land of the Pure
    Your grains today brighter than stars
    Your soil lightened by galaxy of stars
    Awe-struck is the enemy by your resilience
    Shirtwait now hemmed, which torn since time
    O, Blessed Land of the Pure

    Our resolve enamored with new direction
    Our nation today stands tall admass
    No harm will reach it’s extend
    Our banner ascends higher than moon and stars
    And our witness be Mercury and Mars
    O, Blessed Land of the Pure

    Today the nation successfully confirmed
    Now freedom struggle is bygone
    The country’s wealth unlimited and boundless
    We will all be blessed by the wealth
    Of West no fear, of East no dispute
    O, Blessed Land of the Pure

    We will transform the polity of our nation
    Slave no more in our nation
    On the road of progress, swift is our nation
    Independent, fortuitous, youthful and joyous
    Fragrant are winds which were once poisonous
    O, Blessed Land of the Pure

    Your grains today brighter than stars
    Your soil brightened by the galaxy
    O, Blessed Land of the Pure

    Translation is a tricky business. The translator has to resist the urge to add meaning to other than the original intent. Poetry is harder than prose because you are mindful of the balance.

    No translation is good. If acceptable, it is good enough. This is my rendition. I hope others can improve upon it.

    Dr. Jagan Nath Azad, I appreciate your service to the cause of Jinnah. This is an attempt to pay tribute to your efforts.

    And a simultaneous rebuke to Liaqat, the original sinner, the decoupler of Jinnah’s vision. It is too obvious when you read this tarana again and again, why it was a thorn in the side of the those who were not interested in equity and justice. And how fast they moved when Jinnah died.

    I do like the current tarana. It has a stirring feelings and movements and is lofty. And I take away nothing. But I surely would have kept the sharing of the wealth portions. It would have been a very different Pakistan today.

    Nevertheless, there is tomorrow. And tomorrow is the first day for the rest of the times.

    Pakistan Zindabad
    Pakistan Paindabad

    Reference:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qaum%C4%AB_Tar%C4%81na

  35. Watan Aziz says:
    May 7th, 2010 1:21 pm

    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak

    Zare tayray hain aaj sitaron say tabnak
    Roshan hai kehkishan say ka’hin aaj teri khakk
    Tundi-e-hasdan pay hai ghalib tera swaak
    Daman wo sill gaya hai jo tha mudat’toon say chaak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Abb apne aazm ko hai naya rasta pasand
    Apna watan hai aaj zamanay main sir buland
    Ponhcha sakay ga is ko na koi bhi ab gazand
    Apna alam hai chand sitaron say bhe buland
    Abb ham ko daykhtay hain atarad ho ya samaak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Utra hai imtehan main watan aaj kamm’yaab
    Abb huriat key zulf nahin mahiv-e-paich-o-taab
    Daulat hai apne mulk key bay’hudd-o-bay’hisaab
    Hon’gay hum aapp mulk key daulat say faiz’yaab
    Maghrib say hum ko khauff na mushriq say hum ko baak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Apnay watan ka aaj badalnay laga nizam
    Apnay watan main aaj nahin hai koi ghulam
    Apnay watan hai rah-e-taraqi pay tez’gham
    Azad, ba’murad, jawan bakth shad’kaam
    Abb ittr bez hain, jo hawain thien zehyr naak
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    Zare tayray hain aaj sitaron say tabnak
    Roshan hai kehkishan say ka’hin aaj teri khakk
    Aye sir zameen-i-Pak!

    O’Blessed Land of the Pure

    O, Blessed Land of the Pure
    Your grains today brighter than stars
    Your soil lightened by galaxy of stars
    Awe-struck is the enemy by your resilience
    Shirtwait now hemmed, which torn since time
    O’Blessed Land of the Pure

    Our resolve enamored with new direction
    Our nation today stands tall admass
    No harm will reach it’s extend
    Our banner ascends higher than moon and stars
    And our witness be Mercury and Mars
    O’Blessed Land of the Pure

    Today the nation successfully confirmed
    Now freedom struggle is bygone
    The country’s wealth unlimited and boundless
    We will all be blessed by the wealth
    Of West no fear, of East no dispute
    O’Blessed Land of the Pure

    We will transform the polity of our nation
    Slave no more in our nation
    On the road of progress, swift is our nation
    Independent, fortuitous, youthful and joyous
    Fragrant are winds which were once poisonous
    O’Blessed Land of the Pure

    Your grains today brighter than stars
    Your soil lightened by galaxy of stars
    O’Blessed Land of the Pure

    Copyright (c) 2010, Watan Aziz, All Rights Reserved under US Laws and International Treaties for the transliteration and translation of the original works of Dr. Jagan Nath Azad.

    Note: You may freely copy but you must acknowledge the copyright owner Watan Aziz and http://www.pakistaniat.com, All Things Pakistan, as the source of the transliteration and the translation.

  36. Mudusser Hussain says:
    May 7th, 2010 7:21 pm

    A committee was formed who called all the poets and literate persons of the country to produce national anthem. 723 poems were collected, out of Jalandhari’s Anthem was selected….was really our Quaid was so naive to chose anthem first then replace it…? who else had the guts to change what has been said by M. Ali Jinnah… This anthem came to be runner up but it was never chosen in the first place as national anthem then replaced… thst’s crap…

  37. PMA says:
    May 11th, 2010 4:44 pm

    The poem by Azad is fine, but it is just another poem. I like the one by Hafeez. It has nice rhythm and beat to it. So what if it is in Persian. Urdu has its roots in Persian as well. And what about our flag. It too was inspired by the Turkish flag. I think the current debate on National Anthem of Pakistan is silly and trivial.

  38. Nihair says:
    June 5th, 2010 10:47 pm

    Here is a column by Dr. Safdar Mehmood in Jang. After researching, he is rubbishing this claim. As ATP is also mentioned in his column, i am quoting this to keep the record straight.

    http://www.jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/06-06-2010/col4.htm

  39. Akif says:
    June 6th, 2010 12:06 am

    @Nihair, you did a good job of finding this article and posted it here.
    I don’t know why Adil Najam posted this information without any concrete proof . If someone wants people to read his/her blogs atleast a person should have moral courage to provide the right information.
    Anyway thanks to Dr Safdar Mahmood for doing all the hard work and keeping the record straight.
    There should now a be new blog stating the actual story.
    The only link to the whole drama is “ATP friend Beena Sarwar who originally uncovered this via Prof. Azad’s son Chander K. Azad.”

  40. ASAD says:
    June 6th, 2010 1:15 am

    There is nothing in the opinion piece by Safdar Mahmood that contradicts the fact that the first anthem of Pakistan was written by Jagan Nath Azad or that these were its words. That is the only point of importance and the point of this post.

    Whether Jinnah actually asked him to write the anthem or whether someone else did is not really that relevant. What is relevant is that he wrote the first anthem and these were its words.

  41. Adnan Siddiqi says:
    June 6th, 2010 2:47 am

    Dr Safdar cited Pakistaniat in his column and refuted any such claim by mentioning that radio Pakistan’s archive does not have any such record.

    tinyurl.com/2w2oukm

  42. Bakhat says:
    June 6th, 2010 4:59 am

    This is simply not true! Mr Najam can you please reply to Dr Safdar Mehmood’s column? I am waiting for your response.

    http://www.jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/06-06-2010/col4.htm

  43. Watan Aziz says:
    June 6th, 2010 6:38 am

    And since I never saw the birth certificate of Dr. Azad, he was never born either.

  44. Adnan Siddiqi says:
    June 6th, 2010 10:28 am

    @Watan Aziz: don’t you think you just cam up wit a lame analogy to refute Dr.Safdar’s claim?

  45. Baig says:
    June 6th, 2010 10:40 am

    I just read the Safdar Mahmood article (I wish they could make the font size on these larger). For someone who is just trying to “find the truth” he seems NOT to find much at all.

    He does not find a record of the tarana in the radio archive. I am sure there are many many things from that period that are not in the archive, but that does not mean they did not exist. So, I am not too convinced by this just yet.

    Also, I am not sure of all the problems we have this is really the one to get all worked up about. I hope that between Dr. Mahmood and Dr. Najam they will be able to figure out what happened here. There must have been an anthem of some sort between 1947 and when the new anthem came. What was it?

    Doesn’t really matter much now, frankly, but would be nice to know what it was.

  46. Akif says:
    June 6th, 2010 10:41 am

    @Watan Aziz: Again, if there is something worthwhile bring it out. Otherwise it is just waste of bytes.
    @Asad: May be you are right however, facts don’t seem to acknowledge the claim made by Jagannath’s son. May be he has written a poem (which is already posted in the actual post) but it is not a proof that this was our national anthem.
    Debate can go on and on but truth of the story is only Jagannath’s son is the one who is making this claim through Beena Sarwar (one source can’t be sufficient)

  47. Abdul says:
    June 6th, 2010 11:50 am

    Another storm in a tea cup.
    We have sold off all of Jinnah’s ideas and the real enemies of Jinnah and Jinnah’s Paksiatn – the miullahs and the Taliban – are now defining what Pakistan should be. And THIS is the thing to get all excited about.
    Wah bhai wah. What would the Quaid want us to be discussing today: this silly little thing or the menace of the evil Taliban destroying the country he created.

  48. Jawed says:
    June 6th, 2010 12:04 pm

    Here is the column that explains why Safdar Mahmood is raising his unsubstantiated claim and why he is trying to belie this:
    http://criticalppp.org/lubp/?p=316

  49. shahran says:
    June 7th, 2010 6:53 am

    Dr.Safdar Mehmood wrote a column challenging this notion which is presented here.

    http://jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/06-06-2010/col4.htm

  50. Akif says:
    June 7th, 2010 11:14 pm

    @Jawad: I don’t see any relevance between the Naji’s column and Safdar Mahmood’s column. They wrote on two different topics altogether. Also there is a new column by Safdar Mahmood, have a look and then decide. Truth should speak for itself.

  51. Sameer says:
    June 8th, 2010 1:28 am

    http://jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/06-06-2010/c ol4.htm
    and also this one:
    http://jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/08-06-2010/col2.htm

    A historically documented article (not op-ed or hearsay) on Quaid i Azam, Jagan Nath and his supposed national anthem of Pakistan by renowned Pakistani historian Dr Safdar Mehmood. The writer has quoted ATP and Adil Najam too. It’s upto this blog to respond in an intellectually apt way.
    By the way Dr Safdar is not a ThaRRA Chhaap Urdu/Punjabi political commentator. (Although, personally I believe that being a speaker of such beautiful languages, and knowing no or little English doesnt make a man intellectually inferior. After all Ghalib, Bullhe Shah and Shah Hussain etc stood at very high stations of intellect and wisdom) He’s authored many books and articles on Pakistan’s history and politics, and has lectured at many universities around the world, including several in the West, of course. In fact he started his career as a lecturer at Government College Lahore before joining the CSS.
    Plz do read and comment appropriately.
    http://jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/06-06-2010/c ol4.htm
    and also this one:
    http://jang.com.pk/jang/jun2010-daily/08-06-2010/col2.htm

  52. Najam says:
    June 8th, 2010 6:20 am

    I think a correction of facts and admittance of mistake is in order by all involved in spreading this false myth of the original anthem.

  53. Yasin says:
    June 8th, 2010 9:17 am

    See this article by the Chairman of the History Department of Govt College University Lahore for clarification on Azad and Jinnah.

    Here is what he says:
    http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2009-weekly/nos-30-08-2009/dia.htm#3

    “Was Jinnah a man with a secular disposition? That question lures many scholars from far and wide. Jinnah mostly exhibited his secular self through his western attire; taste for food and over all mode of living. He had Ramu as a cook and many non-Muslim friends. He was visibly irritated by Raja Sahib Mehmudabad over his obdurate insistence to promulgate Islamic injunctions in Pakistan and as Sharif ul Mujahid puts it, Jinnah started keeping him at bay. Besides, Jinnah’s famous speech in the constituent assembly on August 11, 1947, asking Jagan Nath Azad to write a national anthem for Pakistan, signifies his secular bent of mind. Jinnah’s choice of a Hindu poet to compose the national anthem is an ample testimony of his secular vision for Pakistan. Jagan Nath Azad is spot on when he says, “Jinnah Sahib wanted to sow the roots of secularism in a country where intolerance had no place.”"

  54. Yasin says:
    June 8th, 2010 9:19 am

    Here are the details of how Azad write the anthem and why. This report goes back to 2005 well before there was even an ATP.
    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_19-6-2005_pg7_31

  55. Aqeel Abbas Jafri says:
    August 16th, 2010 2:39 pm

    Pl. visit the following links to read some more findings on this issue:

    http://mazhar.dk/pakistan/history/Tarana1.jpg

    http://mazhar.dk/pakistan/history/Tarana2.jpg

  56. Aqeel Abbas Jafri says:
    August 16th, 2010 2:55 pm

    The links which I posted in previous comments were difficult to access so I am posting the new links to read this feature in a better way.

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=27582&id=1327996863#!/photo.php?pid=5377981&id=665520495

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=27582&id=1327996863#!/photo.php?pid=5378005&id=665520495&fbid=421202780495

  57. December 31st, 2010 2:54 am

    http://khurramsdesk.blogspot.com/

    Khurram’s Desk

    THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010

    National anthem: fact and fiction
    For some time now, some secularists in Pakistan have been suggesting that (a) Jinnah was in favor of secularism, and therefore (b) he commissioned a Hindu poet to write the national anthem of Pakistan but it was replaced by the present anthem after Jinnah’s death.

    Therefore, it is rather serendipitous that two well-researched books should come out at the same time, each addressing a different half of this statement separately (and both having long titles, but that is beside the point):
    Secular Jinnah and Pakistan: What the Nation Doesn’t Know by the British Pakistani writer Saleena Karim is a 317-page study about whether Quaid-i-Azam Jinnah wanted Pakistan to be a secular state.
    Pakistan Ka Qaumi Tarana: Kiya Hai Haqeeqat, Kya Hai Fasana by Aqeel Abbas Jafri is a 104-page analytical presentation of archival resources about the national anthem of Pakistan.
    The first book is in English, and the second is in Urdu, and let’s begin with the second. Although he is little known abroad, Jafri ‘s name has become synonymous with archival research in Pakistan. One of his most recent crowning achievements is the Urdu Chronicle of Pakistan, which presents a chronological illustrated history of the country since 1947.

    In Qaumi Tarana (allow me to refer to the book by this short title), Jafri shows with conclusive documentary evidence that:
    Pakistan did not have a national anthem in the lifetime of Jinnah.
    The present national anthem was the first to be officially adopted by the state.
    There is no evidence to show that any poem by Jagan Nath Azad was played from radio on 14 or 15 August at all.
    Some of the findings of this book were earlier shared by Jafri in his curtain-raiser article in Urdu press (covered here in a previous post, ‘Jafri reveals the truth’). The book offers much – much – more: a fantastic trip of time travelling to the early days of Pakistan, and inside the secret vaults of classified information, all in a light and refreshing manner.

    I strongly recommend it to everybody. Being a basic document about a key symbol of our sovereignty, i.e. our national anthem, it should be kept in every household (Imagine losing your domicile certificate, passport, identity card and personal documents?). The book is modestly priced at Rs.200, which is roughly the same as a full plate of Biryani plus cold drink (and minus the TIP) – so, please do not “starve” your souls.

    Now, very interestingly, while explaining that his purpose is just to keep the record straight, Jafri clarifies in the preface that it would not have been unexpected if the Quaid had actually got the national anthem written by a Hindu poet, but facts are facts and history needs to be respected. In the same vein he admits: “I do not have any doubts about Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah being secular, liberal and enlightened… Since Islam is the very name of tolerance.”

  58. Asim Kamran says:
    August 14th, 2011 10:44 am

    AoA,
    I would like to bring to your attention that Dr. Aqeel Ahmed Jaffri has performed an investigation about the origin of the national anthem through his book “Pakistan ka qoumi tarana. Kya he Haqiqut Kya he Fasana”. Please correct your record. The national anthem was written by Hafeez Jalundari not Jagan Nath Azad.
    Please refer to this article from BBC Urdu website http://www.bbc.co.uk/urdu/pakistan/2011/08/110813_pakistan_antham_sen.shtml . I would recommend that you should read the book as well.

    Take care

  59. Asjad Sardar says:
    August 15th, 2011 6:42 am

    AOA
    I agree with brother Asim Kamran. Dr. Aqeel ahmad jaffri’s research didnt find any documented proof if Qaid e Azam actually requested him to write national antham for pakistan. Archives from Lahore and Peshawar radio stations, the two working radio stations in pakistan at the time of partitions do not have any records of this antham being aired at that time. It is said that it was aired from Karachi radio station which as per Mr. Jaffri’s research started broadcasting year after the Independence. Peronally i would have had any problem with Jagan nath azad writing the anthem but i am not sure if it is a historical fact.
    Allah knows best
    takecare
    Asjad

  60. Asadullah Qazi says:
    November 1st, 2011 8:07 pm

    Asim Kamran, I would like to tell that this is the first national anthem of Pakistan which was not adopted,though he was a Hindu and choosed to live in India,his anthem was replaced by the one wrote by Hafeez Jalhandhri.
    This helped me a lot

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