Posted on November 15, 2008
Filed Under >Adil Najam, Culture & Heritage, Music, People, Poetry
14 Comments
Total Views: 71883

Email a copy of 'Abida Parveen: Ho Jamalo' to a friend

* Required Field






Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 3 entries.



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 3 entries.


E-Mail Image Verification

Loading ... Loading ...

14 responses to “Abida Parveen: Ho Jamalo”

  1. WK Rashid says:

    Abida Parveen performed in Summer 2017 at London South Bank and all I can say that listening to Abida is a spiritual experience, rather than any other concert.

    Even after so many years, her voice remain strong to mesmerize audiences like no other. Ho Jamalo remains an amazing track which is available on https://www.thesufi.com/sufimusic/abida-parveen/ho -jamalo.html

    Also download 100+ tracks of Abida Parveen at http://www.thesufi.com/sufimusic/abida-parveen.htm l.

  2. Umair says:

    Please Translate into English..:
    Jamal ik Kedi tha jo Jail me Kaid tha.. Angrez Built the Sukkur Barrage, that was very big barrage in SINDH. so for testing purpose.. no body was ready to cross the train from barrage.. so at that time GOVT announces jo Train Cross karega ause Inaam milega.. then Jamal ne Train chalai.. :) then won the game.. means jeet gaya train cross the barrage ..
    so its Ho Jeko Khati Ayo Khair saa.. :” ho Jamal Ho :)”
    Unhe Sukkur wari Pul te.. Ho jamal Ho..
    thats.it :)

    Send Your Comments @ Umairsario@gmail.com.

    Regards
    Your SINDHI..
    Umair

  3. Vishal says:

    Hey Tina
    Abida is still alive and performing at its peek,

  4. baytunur says:

    Ministry of Culture – Government of Pakistan website says:

    Ho Jamalo
    Hey Jamalo or Ho Jamalo is a Sindhi dance which interprets the battle and folk legends of the province. It is danced on the occasions of festivity and celebration. The song tells the tale of the legendary 18th century Sindhi warrior Jamal who defended his homeland against foreign invaders. The main singer sings the verses praising Jamalo’s bravery and each verse is accompanied with shouts of Ho Jamalo by the dancers who go round the main singer, doing simple dance steps. The song picks up speed towards the end.