Electronic Media Under Siege in Pakistan??

Posted on June 2, 2007
Filed Under >Darwaish, Law & Justice, Politics, Society
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By Darwaish

As expected, the Military Government of Pakistan has finally lost its patience and the live coverage of CJ’s bar addresses and live talk shows have been banned from today.

This means there is every chance that we won’t be able to see Live with Talat Hussain or Hamid Mir’s Capital Talk and possibly Dr. Shahid Masood’s Mere Mutabiq for sometime at least. Some of the less dangerous programmes like Aaj Kamran Khan Ke Saath may survive in my view. Meanwhile, in related news, Karachi journalists are now recieving threatening letters with bullets in them.

Our beloved Information Minister Mr. Ghalat Biyani held a press conference today and warned media. He said that government is talking to TV channels and either they trying to convince them to impose a self-censorship which is basically say nothing against Pakistan Army and national security institutions and No Live Coverage of CJ. We will find out exactly what happens in next few days and how far owners of electronic media channels can resist. Those of you following CJ’s Abotabad District Bar visit today must have noticed a sudden change in electronic media coverage, a partial blackout. We are only seeing repetition of recorded clips on all the channels. PEMRA has issued strict orders to all channels NOT to broadcast CJ’s speech today. ARY ‘s transmission has already been banned in Islamabad and Rawalpindi since yesterday mainly because of anti army slogans during Ayaz Amir’s show in Islamabad last week. Talat Hussain also hinted last night that there is a possibility that viewers won’t see him on Aaj TV in coming weeks.

Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists has vowed to challenge this move in highest courts and a petition will be filed on Monday. This step was expected after yesterday’s Corps Commanders Conference which apparently taken strict notice of an organized campaign against National Security Institutions by a minority. Lahore High Court Bar has slammed this move by government. According to Daily Times:

The LHCBA on Friday denounced the government for taking steps to ban the live coverage of the lawyers’ movement. LHCBA representatives said in a joint statement that Information and Broadcasting minister Muhammad Ali Durrani’s statement about changing the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority rules were against the independence of the media. LHCBA president Ahsen Bhoon said a free media was essential for the development of a country. He said, “The military government wants to use the media for its ulterior motives.� He said the lawyers’ movement would continue till the end of the military government. LHCBA secretary Sarfaraz Cheema condemned the Sindh chief minister for allegedly accusing the lawyers for taking foreign grants for the movement against the government.

This whole thing has been triggered after heated speeches and slogans against Pakistan Army during last week’s seminar in Supreme Court Auditorium. Personally, I think some of the speeches and slogans were not at all appropriate and should have been avoided. One can argue about the role of military in politics since 1954 and the corruption that exists at the highest levels. But we should not blame the entire institution that includes ordinary army jawans and junior officers who have nothing to do with politics and who perform their duties in extremely tough conditions so that we can feel secure from internal and external threats.

Its the junior officers and soldiers who die for us in the battle fields and they deserve highest regard. Having said that, it should be clear to our respected generals that since top military leadership is ruling this country (there is hardly a civilian institution that is not headed by a Brigadier Saab these days) and involved in all kinds of politics (who can deny the ugly role of ISI in politics?) therefore they should also learn to take criticism like politicians do.

The days of Muqadas Gaye treatment are over. A conclusion should be made whether Pakistan is supposed to be a social welfare state for people of Pakistan or a National Security State for an institution. And what is this National Security anyways? Have we ever defined it? Once a question was put by a PPP MNA in national assembly asking if army officers declare their assets annually and file their returns like average Pakistani and they got official answer that this question cannot be answered since it is a National Security issue.

While all this is happening, its ironic that parliament and elected members are nowhere to be seen in any major decision making. Chaudhary Shujaat came up with an immature remark that all the lawyers who are talking against military should be shot (goli maar deni chahiye).

Is he not provoking violence?

I hope that common sense prevails before things get out of hands and Pakistan Army gets out of politics and they get back to their real duties. The last thing any sensible person wants is an increase in hatred against the military in ordinary people and possibly a violent clash.

One shouldn’t forget the example of what happened in Argentina and that will be disastrous and a great tragedy for people of Pakistan.

38 Comments on “Electronic Media Under Siege in Pakistan??”

  1. bitterTruth says:
    June 2nd, 2007 12:42 pm

    [quote]The days of Muqadas Gaye treatment are over. A conclusion should be made whether Pakistan is supposed to be a social welfare state for people of Pakistan or a National Security State for an institution[/quote]

    well said!

  2. Ismail Hussein says:
    June 5th, 2007 2:26 pm

    Very nice article on role of military and media in today’s News by Adil Najam. Please make a post here on this.

  3. Akbar A. says:
    June 4th, 2007 11:11 pm

    Sad that the government is taking on these two institutions of judiciary and press at the same time. This will be the undoing of the government.

  4. Moeen Bhatti says:
    June 2nd, 2007 3:24 pm

    Somehow I get a feeling that the things in Pakistan can never be changed without a revolution. And revolutions need blood. We mightnot be able to avoid that. Presently, it seems there is ‘sikha shahi’ in Pakistan.

  5. Fazer says:
    June 2nd, 2007 4:32 pm

    reminds me of what a friend said once, You can criticize God but not Muhammad.

  6. Moeen Bhatti says:
    June 2nd, 2007 4:37 pm
  7. Nasir says:
    June 2nd, 2007 4:45 pm

    پا کستان:ٹی وی چینلز پر نیا سنسر

    پاکستان میں کیبل آپریٹرز Ù†Û’ دھمکی دی Û

  8. Darwaish says:
    June 2nd, 2007 4:56 pm

    Update: Somehow they allowed Dr. Shahid Masood to do his program Mere Mutabiq and it was a classic! Anyone who has missed it, do watch the repeat telecast tomorrow at 2PM. The starting part of the program and the way Dr. Sb took Sheikh Rasheed’s class was just awsome :).

  9. king_faisal says:
    June 2nd, 2007 7:19 pm

    here is a challenge to those pakistanis who reside in the u.s. and think freedom of press is absolute:

    go to a large public space and advertise on behalf al manar tv – the official channel of hizbullah which until recently was a partner in govt of a u.s. ally.

    WARNING – please read this story before attempting the aforementioned stunt:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/5284980.stm

  10. mazhar butt says:
    June 2nd, 2007 7:42 pm

    The live utterances of ex-president Supreme Court namely Hamid ali Khan during the Bar meeting in Islamabad were quite improper and offensive and were sufficient enough for the Govt to find as an excuse for gagging the media. The lawyers or dissidents should not stoop so low as to pass indecent and mutinous personal remarks about the President and the Army Chief as they are culpable at law. If such outbursts had been avoided the govt might have not find a good excuse to restrict activities of the media although I believe that sooner or later the govt would have certainly ‘besieged’ the media for its own sake.Such steps as taken against the media are representative of dictatorship and breach of constitution. Danda zindabad, Pakistan Paindabad !

  11. mazhar butt says:
    June 2nd, 2007 7:52 pm

    [quote comment="51271"]The live utterances of ex-president Supreme Court namely Hamid ali Khan during the Bar meeting in Islamabad were quite improper and offensive and were sufficient enough for the Govt to find as an excuse for gagging the media. The lawyers or dissidents should not stoop so low as to pass indecent and mutinous personal remarks about the President and the Army Chief as that would surely make them culpable at law. If such outbursts had been avoided the govt wouldn’t have found a good excuse to restrict activities of the media although I believe that sooner or later the govt would have certainly ‘besieged’ the media for its own sake.Such steps as taken against the media are representative of dictatorships and are prima facie in breach of constitution. Danda zindabad, Pakistan Paindabad ![/quote]

  12. Eidee Man says:
    June 2nd, 2007 8:40 pm

    This blog is so quick to criticize the military (I am with you on that) but God forbid it mention the MQM’s name in anything…hmmm..

  13. Saad says:
    June 2nd, 2007 9:51 pm

    [quote comment="51243"]Update: Somehow they allowed Dr. Shahid Masood to do his program Mere Mutabiq and it was a classic! Anyone who has missed it, do watch the repeat telecast tomorrow at 2PM. The starting part of the program and the way Dr. Sb took Sheikh Rasheed’s class was just awsome :).[/quote]
    Darwaish – It wouldn’t be possible for the most of us to watch it, so can you please divulge into details of this particular ‘izzat-afzai’ of Sheikh Rasheed?

  14. New York Giants says:
    June 3rd, 2007 12:04 am

    This message is for the journalists and writers of Pakistan. Please keep up the fight, if you fall the nation will fall. You are the soldiers of freedom and rational you must continue your cause, the nation is with you all the way…

    ARY one world & AAJ TV were banned in Islamabad. This is a despicable and cowered attempt by the so called authorities.

  15. MB says:
    June 3rd, 2007 2:21 am

    From DAWN today:-

    “AMNESTY International had declared Morarji Desai a prisoner of conscience because he was thrown into prison by Indira Gandhi. One day Morarji Desai himself became prime minister. So lawyer activist A.G. Noorani very enthusiastically went to see him with Amnesty volunteers, to request Morarji Desai to let the group visit all parts of the country freely, including Kashmir.

    Noorani was in for a surprise. “What is Amnesty International?â€

  16. omar r. quraishi says:
    June 3rd, 2007 5:07 am

    Editorial, The News, June 3, 2007

    Censorship and the judicial crisis

    The only way forward out of the current crisis emanating from the suspension of the Chief Justice of Pakistan is for the government to withdraw its reference. If it cannot bring itself to do that then it needs to engage in a dialogue with the opposition, and President Musharraf needs to choose either the army chief post or stand for re-election as a civilian candidate. The way forward is not by imposing censorship on the print and electronic media, which seems to be the new government’s tactic for now. Not only are the threats and warnings to the media that it must fall in line and keep the ‘national interest’ paramount going to not work in this day and age, they will be thoroughly counter-productive and only exacerbate an already tense situation. The reason for the clampdown on the print and electronic media clearly has to do with the thinking in the circles that matter in this country that the whole crisis has been blown out of proportion by the media and hence it will be deflated once the media, especially the TV channels, are brought under the censorship leash.

    But the questions that need to be asked of the government are the following: Who was it that made the Chief Justice of Pakistan non-functional? What was the manner in which this action against him was taken and a presidential reference filed? Even if the charge that he was fond of extra protocol or that he asked for favours for his son is true then isn’t that also the case with many senior state functionaries? Furthermore, who carried out the attack on the office of Geo TV and this newspaper in Islamabad? Who threatened a journalist of this newspaper on a Voice of America radio show and then proceeded to deny it, only to eat his words when a recording of the show’s transcript was aired on Geo TV? What was the motive for the arrest and continued incarceration of former Mirpurkhas DIG, Saleemullah Khan, and for putting him in a prison where his life, as claimed by him, could have come under threat? And if the affidavit of the chief justice is to be believed, who confronted him on March 9 at the president’s camp office and tried to impress on him to quit his post? Who stood by and idly watched as over 40 people lost their lives in Karachi on May 12, did nothing as the offices of a TV channel came under attack by armed men for several hours on May 12 and then proceeded to hold a ‘National Unity’ rally the same evening in Islamabad, where PTV showed participants doing the bhangra and having a generally fun time? Who prevented the chief justice from leaving the premises of Karachi’s airport? Who made uncharitable remarks against judges of the Sindh High Court after the court took suo motu notice of the tragic events of May 12? Who cancelled the book launch of Ayesha Siddiqa’s Military Inc, in the process ensuring that it becomes a best-seller? Who prevented Imran Khan from entering Sindh and confined him to Lahore for three days (also in the process making him a hero to some)? Who included the names of 12 prominent journalists on a list calling them enemies of the people and placed bullets in envelopes in the cars of three of the 12?

    There are many more questions but these are some of the more pressing ones that come to mind. Surely, it wasn’t the print or the electronic media that did all these things. As has been pointed out several times in the recent past – and not just by this newspaper but by pretty much the whole print and electronic media – the media is a mirror and reflects reality. If it takes sides or begins to show a one-sided version of events as they unfold then it should be held accountable and that will be reflected via the erosion of its credibility (a la PTV). Also, if for the sake of argument, it is accepted that the media is presenting an unbalanced anti-government version then what about coverage in the international media and what of perception on the street against the government’s policies and actions, especially post-March 9?

    By pursuing such a policy, the president risks alienating (a whole lot of them have already been alienated after March 9 and then May 12) those who still see him as someone who can take on the extremists and deliver the country on a progressive and liberal path. Of course, many of these people will now be questioning the glaring dichotomy in the government’s readiness to take on the media but unwillingness to take on extremist vigilantes such as those in Lal Masjid and Jamia Hafsa, who continue to hold parts of the federal capital hostage (and as of June 1 tried to create a law and order situation at PIMS). Censoring the media will make an already bad situation worse and is advice that the government should do without. It is bad for its image domestically as well as overseas but more importantly, it will not bring any kind of advantage to its side.

    For instance, it is quite unlikely that the number of people turning out to receive the chief justice will dwindle in the coming weeks merely because the TV channels are not carrying the rallies and demonstrations live, just like the ban on Military Inc’s launch only served to increase its demand among readers. Also, in this day and age there are several ways to counter this live ban (one assumes that those behind the censorship policy are not aware of the fact that blogs have come of age in Pakistan as have websites like YouTube as so on, where such raw footage can be shown). Those who hold the reins of power need to ask themselves what it is that has brought things to this pass. Does the fact that the president of the country also happens to be army chief have something to do with the criticism that is being laid at that institution’s doorstep? Of course politicians have themselves to blame by covertly and sometimes overtly courting the army and asking it to step in but that doesn’t absolve the latter of blame in outreaching its mandate. Surely, if the president of the country were a civilian, or if the corporate and business interests of the military’s various welfare foundations not so expansive, the armed forces would have been spared much of the criticism. In the current situation regarding the action taken against the Chief Justice of Pakistan, it is only to be expected that people will ask whether the president’s being also army chief played a decisive role in the unfolding of events.

    The only way forward is to treat the cause of the crisis, not the symptoms (which is being done by what seems to be the beginning of a media clampdown). Such actions, may in the eyes of some, seem as if the government is trying to show to the country and the world at large that it is in charge, but it ends up giving the opposite impression – i.e., that it is now panicking. The government would be advised to either withdraw the reference or come to some sort of compromise with the opposition parties on the president taking a final decision on presenting himself as a civilian candidate.

  17. Rumi Dossal says:
    June 3rd, 2007 9:49 am

    45 years ago the per capita income of South Korea was USD 2.00 less than Pakistans. Two for nearly a quarter century South Korea was ruled by a MILITARY regime and see where they are now. Today South Koreas per capita income is approx. USD 12000.00 and us Pakistanis USD 850.00,thats almost 15 times more than us. Till we Pakistanis do not get ourselves educated, be tolerent, disciplined and improve upon our social behaviour we do not deserve freedom and democracy the way we expect it. Singapore even today does not allow their citizen to chew chewing gums, eat betel nut leaf or tobacco in public, spit on roads and in public places, construct a residential property without the police department’s verification, impose heavy fines for breaking traffic rules, banned racial or religious hatredness against any class etc. Now compare us Pakistanis with them. My question, do we deserve the freedom and democracy? We first need to improve upon ourselves before expecting or talking against our Government.

    Lets first clean ourselves before throwing stones in glass houses.

  18. bitterTruth says:
    June 3rd, 2007 10:00 am

    [quote]Lets first clean ourselves before throwing stones in glass houses.[/quote]

    Old excuse for the failure in providing basic rights to its citizens. Its just a technique of ruling class to continue their luxury life style.

  19. Mutazalzaluzzaman Tarar says:
    June 3rd, 2007 1:06 pm

    Omar Q:

    great editorial. imo, another question that the Musharraf dictatorship must answer is who is behind the assassination of Hammad Raza. I wonder if you deliberately excluded that or if you just overlooked it?

  20. omar r. quraishi says:
    June 3rd, 2007 1:14 pm

    No we didnt deliberately or otherwise overlook it Mr Tarar

  21. MQ says:
    June 3rd, 2007 2:50 pm

    [quote]Till we Pakistanis do not get ourselves educated, be tolerent, disciplined and improve upon our social behaviour we do not deserve freedom and democracy the way we expect it. [/quote]

    This is a silly argument. It’s like saying a child does not deserve to go to school until s/he learns to brush her/his teeth, wear neat clothes, be disciplined and improves her/his social habits etc. These things are not learnt sequentially but simultaneously. One encourages and reinforces the other. Same is the case with democracy.

    [quote]… do we deserve freedom and democracy? [/quote]

    Again, a silly question. Yes, of course, we do deserve freedom and democracy. Everyone does!

  22. bitterTruth says:
    June 3rd, 2007 3:20 pm

    Another assault? Geo transmission suspended in many cities.

  23. mazhar butt says:
    June 3rd, 2007 8:18 pm

    It’s sickening to repeatedly hear the phrase ”WRIT OF THE GOVERNMENT” from the loud mouths of more-loyal-than-the-king functionaries of the present regime.After all what is the Writ of Government? Is it a dodo? Nay, the writ of government is an aggregate will of all its national Institutions. However, in its present context as drummed about by the ‘aides’ of the present regime it seems only to mean the WRIT OF THE MILITARY in all its form and nature! Institutions such as the Judiciary, the Media, the Military, the Proponents and the Opponents in the Parliament,etc all together merge to form the so called Writ of the Government. If this Writ is taken in Isolation it is not writ of the government at all,,,,,,it is authoritarianism. If the writ of the Judiciary, the Supreme Court is stripped of its Writ how on earth could it be taken that the Writ of Government does exist?
    It certainly does not. The only Writ the country has now is the writ of the military and its coterie of political supporters, a bunch of ministers. Let us not deceive us that we are living under a writ of government in this country. we are a colony of our own military who dictates its writ as it deems fit for serving its own interest. That interest, ofcourse, is to stay in power as long as it can.

  24. Aqil Sajjad says:
    June 3rd, 2007 11:02 pm

    Kabir Ali Wasti (a prominent PML Q leader) criticises Musharraf on Dr. Shahid Masood’s program on Geo:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ko1fbP1iGaE

  25. Kruman says:
    June 4th, 2007 1:23 am

    NOTE FOR ALL PATRIOTIC PAKISTANIS
    =================================
    Please call Pakistan Bar Council and urge them to record their own videos of CJP Iftikhar Chaudhry’s addresses (plus all the lawyers’ speeches) and upload them on video google (youtube has a 10 minute limit).

    Just finished talking to the secretary of Pakistan Bar Council on the phone. The main numbers for the Pakistan Bar Council are:
    92-51-9206805, 92-51-9206922.

    Their web address is:
    http://pakbarcouncil.org/html/about.html

    Contact numbers including mobile numbers of prominent lawyers like Hamid Khan and Rashid Rizvi can also be found on their website:
    http://pakbarcouncil.org/html/contacts.html

    Please call them, don’t underestimate the power of people’s pressure!

    Thanks!

  26. MAK says:
    June 4th, 2007 6:19 am

    [quote comment="51457"][quote]Till we Pakistanis do not get ourselves educated, be tolerent, disciplined and improve upon our social behaviour we do not deserve freedom and democracy the way we expect it. [/quote]

    This is a silly argument. It’s like saying a child does not deserve to go to school until s/he learns to brush her/his teeth, wear neat clothes, be disciplined and improves her/his social habits etc. These things are not learnt sequentially but simultaneously. One encourages and reinforces the other. Same is the case with democracy.

    [quote]… do we deserve freedom and democracy? [/quote]

    Again, a silly question. Yes, of course, we do deserve freedom and democracy. Everyone does![/quote]

    I don’t believe in your comments. We cannot handle freedom and democracy – you see the results! Obviously you are not in the same situation – are you actually living in Pakistan or in some Western country? I believe Mr Rumi has hit the nail on the head. You start with education and discipline and tolerance, this will facilitate the path to democracy. As for the comparison to the child, this does not make sense at all. A child learns to brush their teeth and wear clothes and then does go to school, this is the logical process, as is education and discipline the path to democracy.
    Pakistanis who leave their country for higher education and then stay abroad to work, and then “pretend to care” – that is where the probelm lies. If they returned to give back to the country what they have learned, then perhaps Pakistan has a chance to move up a level in terms of education and discipline.

  27. Sohail says:
    June 4th, 2007 2:14 pm

    http://www.pakistanimedia.com/vid/imranonjawabdeh.wmv

    the above interview was one of the reasons along with Dr. Shahid Masood’s Kabir Ali Wasti interview

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ko1fbP1iGaE

    and his Saturday’s (Mere Mutabiq Classical)
    could anyone upload it please…

    a must see as lots of people couldn’t watch it in Pakistan

  28. omar r. quraishi says:
    June 6th, 2007 6:44 am

    Arbitrary & unjust

    It seems that the government is readying itself for a war on the media, particularly the electronic one, in the country. This is most unfortunate and troubling given that it already has one problematic front — the ongoing judicial crisis with the legal community up in arms against it — to deal with. What else can one make of the several amendments announced by the government on Tuesday in the laws regulating the electronic media? Coming in the midst of the judicial crisis and increasing pressure being applied by the government on the print and electronic media on coverage of the crisis and its related rallies and protests, the changes have been made via a presidential ordinance, just a few days before the National Assembly was to meet in session. In this context, it would be fair to say that the sole aim of the changes is to bring the media in general, and the electronic one in particular, to a point of submission.

    The changes themselves go against the very spirit of natural justice which demands that before the state or one of its agencies takes any punitive action against a non-state entity for violation of the law, the latter be given adequate warning about such action. Furthermore, the right to lodge an appeal against and question any such action is an intrinsic part of the due process of law. Also, another important element of natural justice, contained in the maxim ‘audi alteram partem’ — that the other side’s view must also be heard — has been violated by the changes. How else does the government justify increasing the penalty ten-fold, authorising the state electronic media regulator, PEMRA, to confiscate equipment, seal the premises of TV channels or cancel a channel’s licence without referring the matter first to a council of complaints (as envisaged under legislation that Tuesday’s ordinance amended)?

    Also, the government’s intention that pressure on the media is going to be further tightened is shown by bringing under PEMRA’s purview even video images relayed on mobile phones and the Internet. This shows panic on the part of the government in that it now wants to even control what people see on their mobile phones and the Internet. It is also an indication of how desperate it is to stamp out coverage of the rallies and protests related to the judicial crisis. In addition to this, PEMRA has been given, quite arbitrarily, sweeping authority to make rules and regulations from time to time to enforce the ordinance. This new proviso can always be used by this or any other government to further increase pressure on the electronic media.

    Clearly, the signs — especially with this new ordinance — are ominous. There should be no doubt about the fact that the effects of this widening battle/confrontation with the media are going to be disastrous — for the country, for civil society and for the government as well. For starters, the international image of the government, which some have cultivated thanks to Pakistan’s participation in the US-led war against terrorism, is sure to take a battering (the US State Department has already commented on it, saying that the media should be able to carry out its job of reporting the judicial crisis). Further to that, and perhaps more importantly, whatever support that the government had among domestic public opinion is sure to diminish. That the changes were made by an ordinance, when there is an elected parliament, and when many PEMRA provisions were enacted as recent as February of this year, is a deathly blow to whatever democracy there is in Pakistan at this point in time.

    Surely, the way forward out of the crisis is not to open another, potentially dangerous, front with the media. Those at the helm of affairs need to understand that (a) the crisis unfolding before it has not been initiated or manipulated by the media as it seems to sadly believe, that (b) curbs of the electronic and print media, in this day and age; and with public opinion generally in synch with the view that the crisis is of the government’s own making (and worsening by every passing day because its guiding principle seems to be the proverb ‘Cut your nose to spite your face’), are only going to exacerbate the situation and further lower the credibility of the government in the eyes of most Pakistanis as well as overseas observers; that (c) simply imposing stringent censorship and banning TV channels will not make the crisis disappear, for the simple reason that the media did not create it and (d) that the only way to defuse the situation is for the prime mover — i.e., the government — to take appropriate steps such as withdrawing the reference against the chief justice, reversing the media curbs and the president choosing either the post of army chief or president.

    Editorial, The News, June 6, 2007

  29. Sadai_Qalandar says:
    June 6th, 2007 4:07 pm

    Thanks admin. Returning back to the subject, the media is digging its heels for a fight. They’ve tken a cue from the lawyers and I don’t see them succumbing to pressures. The govt using the same playbook, just like they dressed people as lawyers to derail lawyers’ movement, they are now dressing up goons as journalists. This led to the scuffle in NA yesterday.

    First the bar and the bench stood up against General Musharraf’s govt, now the media has accepted the challenge too. I think teachers are next and one by one other segments of the society will join the movement to reclaim Pakistan from the jaws of blood-thirsty sharks guised in uniform.

  30. Sadai_Qalandar says:
    June 6th, 2007 4:12 pm

    [quote comment="51212"]Sad that the government is taking on these two institutions of judiciary and press at the same time. This will be the undoing of the government.[/quote]

    Reminds me Hitler’s great folly (and belive me Musharraf is turning into a mini-Hitler), opening a 2nd front by attcking Russia. I am not a historian but I believe Napolean made a similar fatal miskate i.e. he opened multiple fronts. Correct me if I am wrong.

  31. Lahori says:
    June 6th, 2007 4:26 pm

    This SMS is doing the ropund in Pakistan these days:

    Question=”If a boat carrying Musharraf, Shaukat Aziz and Altaf Hussain sinks, guess who will be saved?”

    ..

    ..

    ..

    Answer=”Pakistan”

  32. Nasir says:
    June 6th, 2007 5:12 pm

    بارÛ

  33. Nasir says:
    June 6th, 2007 5:14 pm

    سندھ Û

  34. mazhar butt says:
    June 6th, 2007 5:38 pm

    Till we Pakistanis do not get ourselves educated, be tolerent, disciplined and improve upon our social behaviour we do not deserve freedom and democracy the way we expect it.

    This is a silly argument. It’s like saying a child does not deserve to go to school until s/he learns to brush her/his teeth, wear neat clothes, be disciplined and improves her/his social habits etc. These things are not learnt sequentially but simultaneously. One encourages and reinforces the other. Same is the case with democracy.

    … do we deserve freedom and democracy?

    Again, a silly question. Yes, of course, we do deserve freedom and democracy. Everyone does!

    ————

    Unles we Pakistanis change our mentality and learn to live an honorable life in the society we shouldn’t expect anything we don’t deserve. Freedom and democracy has no meanining if we do not realize the rights of others and live a respectful and dignified life. freedom and democracy have been in Pakistan in one or the other forms and that’s because we people deserved as much and no more ! With a most corrupt and shameless society (in general) we must not dream for miracles to happen. Lets all act in unison for the splendid goal we aspire for . Remember : God doesn’t help those who don’t want to help themselves.

  35. mozang bijjli says:
    June 6th, 2007 11:31 pm

    its tangentail but i just wanted to apologize for recommending imran khan as our new leader in one of my posts few days ago, but here i’d like to take my word back as he has reportedly cut a deal with MQM and has gone to spain to hide his ugly face. A report from the news goe like this
    “By our correspondent

    KARACHI: The Sindh government withdrew on Wednesday a ban imposed on Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf chief Imran Khan from entering the province.

    Sources told The News the ban, imposed on May 24, had been withdrawn on instructions from the Governorç—´ House. The authorities summoned the staff of the Home Department after office hours and issued the notification of cancellation of the order, the sources added.

    A provincial leader of the PTI claimed there had been a patch-up between Imran and the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) after negotiations through some mutual friends. The sources said Imran had left for Spain to meet his children. çš„mran may not file the case against Altaf in the British court,・the PTI leader added.”

  36. mazhar butt says:
    June 7th, 2007 5:13 am

    most probably Imran will not file a suit against Altaf Hussain,,,,,,,,,,, after all, politicians are chip of the same block !

  37. Aqil Sajjad says:
    June 7th, 2007 11:04 am

    Hold on guys. It’s a bit premature to decide that Imran Khan has patched up with MQM and is not going to file the law suit by reading just a report in which the correspondent has not even been named. This could even have been planted at the behest of MQM possibly with the connivance of some turncoat in PTI.

    Here is a denial by someone in the May 12 group (this is the group of Pakistanis in England who have decided to work with Imran Khan on the May 12 issue).

    “Imran Khan was scheduled to leave for Spain with his children from long before. He will be back in London tomorrow.

    “Imran Khan met with his solicitor (who is also named Imran Khan) on Monday the 4th of June. May 12th members were also present. The case is proceeding ahead as planned. I just called up the London offices of the PTI. They are denying that this report is accurate and have promised to investigate the source of this news.”

  38. mozang bijjli says:
    June 7th, 2007 7:53 pm

    Thanks Aqil!
    i was too schocked and disappointed at this report that I wrote to PTI via there web site and giving a piece of my mind, i never expected a reply from them but they were so good as to send a reply with in hours and in their answer a Mr ali zaidi of PTI has vehemently denied the report quoting it as a misinformation on the behest of agencies.
    I for my self was very angry even mad at Imran khan because I have started to look at him as a harbinger of change we so much covet.
    I am not a karachite and have nothing personal against altaf hussain but his maniac killlings on May 12 has forced me to pray for his equally torterous death by God if no man in pakistan has courage to speak against him. I know Altaf hussains ibrat-naak-maut is not going to bring the innocents killed in his satanic endeavours. i shiver when i think the one dead on may 12 might be an only son, a newly wed husband, a father of little children. Altaf hussain may escape courts and trial but he can not escape judgement of God which is ultimate.
    Good thing is Imarn khan is fighting for us. and is not harassed by MQM.

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